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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1921"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maidsandman19211921stud 



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1921 



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Apology 

— o — 

nPoward.s this our Annual, friend, 

f Tse not a scornful look ; 

IJut let your thoughts descend, on the 

l^any weeks it took, 

A nd you yourself defend, 

^Jor let others blame, the book. 

— G. E. '2:1 



(55 



TO 



TRACY I. HICKMAN 

Chiiiniuin HiyJi-Schuol Cutniiiitttc 
Board of Education 



To one wlioso fine eiitliusiasin for Tubinan'.s pros- 
perity lias proni|)te'il liiiii to continuous efforts on 
her belialf and lias stiniulated every student to liiglier 
ideals, this volume is dniioated with the affectionate 
regards of the 

Senior Class 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-One 




. St. 






< 2 __ . 



? - 1 ? ^ I" 

V- i~ ^^ 






Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



History of Tubman 



D 



HE C'liiss of 1921 of tlu' Tubman High School would leave as a gift to 
tile Tuljinan girls of today and tomorrow, this brief liistorical sketcli 
of the school. 



Before the Tubman High School was established by the Board of Educa- 
tion in 187-i, there were no public high scliools for girls in Augusta. Prior to 
that time there were many private schools and tutors to offer a girl a higli 
school education. 

In 1874 ^Irs. Emily Tubman purciiased tlie Christian Church building at 
711 Reynolds Street and presented it to the Hoard of Education to be used as*;, 
a girls" high school. 

Mrs. Tubman was Miss Emily Thomas of Kentucky. In 1817 she married 
Mr. Richard Tubman, a rich merchant of Augusta, Georgia. At liis death 
Mr. Tubman left his widow a large fortune. Mrs. Tubman was interested in 
many coniinunity enterprises in Augusta. To some of these she gave large 
sums of money. Therefore, she purciiased the Christian Church and its ))re- 
.^entation to tlie Board for the purpose above mentioned was in kee]>ing witli 
iier deep interest in Augusta. When Mrs. Tubman presented tlie churcii 
building on Reynolds Street to the Board of Education, one of the conditions 
of the gift was, that if for any reason this site were ever abandoned as a girls' 
high school, it should then become the duty of the Trustees of the Acadeniv of 
Richmond County to sell the property and divide the jiroceeds between the 
Academy of Richmond County and the D'Antignac Free School. 

This disposition of tiie old school lot on Reynolds Street was made after tiie 
scliool building was burned to the ground in the great fire of March 22, 191(5. 

Mrs. Tubman left no eiiilowmeiit to tile Tubman Higli School. The school 
has always been entirely su})ported by the public school fund of the county 
and state as administered by tlie Richmond County Board of Education. 

The Tubman High School has iiad only four principals: Mr. Ben \eely. 
Rev. William Beane, Mr. John Xeely, and .Mr. T. H. Garrett, who still holds 
the office after fifteen years of valuable service to this institution. 

Tile first class, consisting of only eight girls, graduated at the Tubman 
in 1869. _. The school has grown steadily since that time and at present there 
are fifty-two in the graduating class. There are now six hundred and fifty 
in the student body and a faculty of thirtv-two members. 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 

The building on Reynolds Street was three times enlarged by the Board 
of Education. On Marcli 22, 1916, the building and entire equipment were 
totally destroyed by fire. 

Plans were immediately drawn for a new school. Two years before the 
fire the Board of Education purchased a tract of land on Walton Way, known 
as the Scliutzen Platz. In Xovcniber, 191(i, the j)eople of Augusta and Ricli- 
niond County voted a bond issue of $100, ()()() for the erection of a girls' high 
school on the present Walton Way site. Tlie ])lans for the school were drawn 
by Mr. G. Lloyd Preacher, architect, and the construction of the building was 
awarded to the Palmer-Spivey Construction Company. Work on the building 
was begun in January, 1917, and after many interru])tions due to the World 
War, the building was comjileted and first occu])ied February 18, 1918. From 
March 22, 1916, until the new building was completed, the sessions of the 
school were held in Sunday School Building of the First Presbyterian Cliurch, 
the First Baptist Ciiurcii, basement of Central Grannnar School, anil a resid- 
ence at 617 Telfair Street. This condition necessarily made it hard for the 
school to carry on its work, but at no time did the spirit of the school, for 
which the Tubman has long been famous, fail to assert itself. It was a hayjpy 
day when tlie long talked of new Tubman scliool with its modern building, com- 
plete equipment and its beautiful grounds became at least a reality. 

The new Tubman ranks among the finest liigli schools in tiic country, and 
is the pride of Augusta. 

— Anna C. Eve. 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



Tubman 



— o 

(To tune of "Mariric") 

]Mv dear old 'ruhinaii, I'm alwa_v> tliinkiiii>' of vou. 

Tubman. I'll tell the world I love vou. 

Life ahead holds treasures for me; 

I've learned Latin, Histoi'v. Math, and evervthing 

At Tubman. You've given me education: 

I'll be always true; 

After all is said and done, there is reallv onl\' one, 

O, Tubman, Tubman, it's you. 

And now, dear Tubman, obi bow I bate to leave vou; 

Tubman, what g'lorv can I give vou? 

When life's journey is at its start, 

I will say 'twas you who had a great big part, 

O, Tubman, in gi\ing ins])iration, 

Grace, and virtue, too; 

.\fter all is said and done, there is reallv onlv one, 

O, Tubman. Tubman, it's you. 

— Xell F. Russell. 



[HI 




ttbtnan 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



Faculty 



-o- 



Mk. T. H. Garrett I'riniijKil 

Miss A. Dokothv Haixs - Latin 

Miss Axxie M. Pac:e French 

Miss Julia A. Flisch ..- History 

Miss Gertride J. Comev English 

Miss Lciise Parks ., English 

Miss Frances I^. West General Seieiiee and Biology 

Miss Pailine Holi.ev Mathematics 

]\Iiss Willamette Greex Mathematics 

Miss Mary Louise Wii.sox .".... English and French 

Miss Axxa H. Waru Commercial Geography 

Miss Margaret B.\ttle Vocal Mnsic 

Mrs. Margaret H. Hirst Civics and History 

Miss Mary K. Ha.mii.tox Latin and English 

Miss Furlow Hollixgswortii Commerci(d Subjects 

Miss Eloise B. McBeth Applied Art 

Miss Winnie May Smith Physics and Chemistry 

Miss Willie M. Bomar Domestic Science 

Miss Marcia A. Clark Domestic Arts 

Miss Ray D. Lorm.\x Physical Training 

Miss Lois Eve ,.. Civics and General Science 

Miss Margaret E. Baker History 

Miss Lora ]M. Pearce English and Civics 

Miss Lilll\x Goolsby ....History and Civics 



115] 



Class -21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



To the Faculty 



As we leave tlie lialLs of Tubman and we bid it fond adieu, 
Many thoughts and wishes kind are in each heart ; 

And we're tliinking, our dear Faculty, iiow much we owe to you, 
For the inspiration wliich your lives impart. 

AVitii a ])urj)0se true and earnest and devotion that's sublime, 

Vou have guided us along the narrow path ; 
Not alone in teaching lessons you've employed your useful time. 

In mere languages, or sciences, or math. 

But with wisdom and with patience through difficulties hard, 

You have shaped us for the life we are to live ; 
Tho' we've often pulled against you and your efforts we have marred. 

And cooperation we have failed to give. 

So here's to Tubman Faculty, we wish tliem every joy 

And happiness — good wishes by the ton ; 
To them, the love and loyalty, in truth, without alloy. 

Of the Senior Class of Nineteen Twenty-One. 

— Martha Jarrell. '21. 



[16] 




jseoaiQR 



SARAHWYLY. 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAX Tub ma n 

Senior Class 

— o— 

Colors — Pink and White ~ Flower — Pink Roso-bud 

Motto — Live to Learn and Learn to Live 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Belle Walker President 

Sara Evaxs Vice-President 

Gladys Couch ._ Secretary 

Bessie Plumb Treasurer 




]?Ei.i.E Walker 

"From hrr /i/^v droppt'il f/fii- 
tlr fiirrr." 

President, Senior and Junior 
Class, Senior Team. 




,-_^ 




Sara Evans 

■•./ mirni henrt miikilli a 
rhi'crfitl rtntntinitnrr," 

Viee-President Senior Class. 




[ISI 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




Mei.anie Andekson 

"She liki'.i to se-ic, ■'■■hi' lilii'.f to 
rooty. Hut when it comes to 
l>ook.t — She has to be shook!" 



1\ 




OuTBaT?ST OT 
3KILLIANTCV 



15ESSIE Harnes 

■■liii/oiie, iliill riire ; thou unit 
I sliolt never aiiree." 





DORJIA Bl.ITCHINllTON 

••Her modest answer and 
i/racrfiil itir show her wine and 
(jood as she is fair." 





Mary Bostick 

'•Convince this wonmn ttif(unst 
her will, she will l>i- of the same 
opinion still." 

Meiiibt-r Varsity '20, '21. 




[191 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Frances Brawner 

•■Drink not too deeply at the 
fountain of knozc'led(fe lest ye 
strangle.'' 





Caroline Brown 

"Pleasant and kind is flu- — 
the heavens such charms did 
(live her that admired she 
might be." 





CoRiNEE Brown 

"The last link is broken that 
l>inds me to this school." 





Deryl Ci.akk 

",/ wise man has fa art like 
a fool sometimes, or no one 
will take him seriously." 

Photograph Editor of Annual. 




r-'()i 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




Mary Cook 

••Her voice wax ever soft, 
(/eiitle rnxl low — nn ereellent 
th'uiii in a woman." 





Gladys Corcu 

"So one hut she rind heaven 
knows of what slie ix thinkhu/." 

Secretary Senior Class. 





Louise Dye 

•7 am not merry, but do be- 
quile the thiny I am by seem- 

int/ otherwise" 

President of Glee Chili. 





A>r>fA Eve 

"To hurry and worry )'.« not 
my creed. Thinys will luijiiien 
— so what's the need.'" 

Athletic Editor of Annual; 
Senior Team. 




[211 



Class '"21 



.MAIDS and A MAN 



Tiibtiuni 




Minnie Goi.die Fell 

'Of her bni/bt face, one 
rlance will trace a picture on 
the lirain." 





Mary Ferguson 

'■A f/irl nat of K'orrfs, Init 
(if action." 

Editor-in-chief of Annual ; 
Representative on Council Ho- 
nor League '20; Senior Team. 





Ida Fogel 

" 'Tis wiser to t)e i/ood than 
IhicI: and safer to lie meek- 
than fierce.'' 





Aleen Fowke 

'■With iientle i/et jird'ailin;/ 
force, intent ujion tier destined 
course, (/raceful and useful in 
all slir does." 



[22] 




Tub man 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




/!^^ 



Elizabeth Grenekeh 

'•She is no foe to iiny man. 
hut she can talk to heat the 
liand." 






/ 


i 


j<t 







Gene Greneker 

"Hanci sorrow! Care u'ill kill 
(I cat: so therefore let's In- 
'inerrif." 





Hattie Beli.e Griffin 

"Hisses : The tale that J re- 
late this lesson seems to rarrji 
— chose not alone a proper 
mate, hut proper time — to 

nitirn/.'' 





Melrose Hamilton 

■■ir/i»,vc honor is her honest 
thoiKjhl. and simple truth her 
■utmost skill!" 




^i.."ii«^ 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Marv Hughes 

"Better Idle than never." 





Irene Jackson 

•'All her faults are such that 
one loi^es her still the better 
fur them." 

President Athletic Associa- 
tion, "21; Vice-President Ath- 
letic Assnciiition "20; Member 
\'arsity "20, "21; Captain Fresh 
and Soph Teams. 





Martha Jarrei.i. 

■The blush is beautiful, i/el 
sometimes inconvenient." 

President Honor League "20; 
Senior Team; Literary Editor 
ot" Annual. 





.\nN1K I.(U- .IliriN'SON 

"There are thnutfhts tno tteejt 
for ■icurils." 




2^] 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class '21 




Velma Johnson 

'Thy merit is a wiirraiif for 
fhtf weicomeS' 



60J-/0 - y 





•MARr.ARET .loXKS 

"^^'rit^■ me «.v one who Uii'e^ 
her felUnc-man." 





[\f. 



o o o o 



Isabel Kenukkk 

"Xothinff but herself can be 
her parallel." 

Senior Team. 





I.ot'isE Martin 

"./ fair exterior is o silent 
rerommeiiihifion.'' 




[25] 



Class '21 



:MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




M AllV MfCl IRE 

"Were silfitrr ifohlrn, Vil hi' 
II inlllioii(iirf." 





Lucille McCommons 

'•Ez^i'r jit hill;! i.v iif .lervice tn 
(Hif ic'ho kiKiii's h'nc to uai' the 
tncil" 




^i%"^ 




ii 



V A 




Marcaret McCiowax 

■'lUdufiful as sxcef't, and 
i/(ntnt/ an hcaufiful, and soff an 
tf(Kfi}(f and <f<ni as soft, and 
innarcnf as (/aif." 

Sriiior Teani. 





A N X I K K \' E I . V N .^ I E V i; it 

'One of Ihr hrst fhcrv is. 
\'arsitv 'lM. 




Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




MaRGARI'.T Mil TON 

"Her waif.s are iL'aifs of pleas- 
antness, and all her paths are 

peace." 








/?i 



''-I! ' 




GEHTBinF. MOOBE 

"To hi- itriiit is III lir mil- 
■underslood." 





i 




Mamie -Morris 

■"O, iit'tittii'i- :<chnhtr. ichdt if 
fame/" 

Member Varsitv '2\. 





I.iiiiE Piatt 

■■'rh>itkiii(i is <in idle u'aste 
nf time." 




Class 'M 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tuhr 




Bessit Pi.t'mb 

"Her future will he as her 
/> resent — ahcaifs sniilini/:'' 

Treas, Senior Class; Sec- 
Treas. Junior Class. 





Dorothy Hobisox 

*'L('t us he silenf, fur so are 
the ifads." 





Mary Kosexbi.att 

'"(ret thee hence follif, J knoic 
fhre niif.'" 





Katiii.i:p:n Hositr 

"Sniih' and fhr class sniUe.s 
cifh i/nu." 



[28] 




Tiibinan 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




KAiiirm NK H rsniNC 
'To kinnc lar is to love hi 









Nki.1. KrssEi.i. 

"Wvarivif all that xci'iifhl of 
l((tniin(/ I'mlifhi likv a floxvcr,'' 








i- V - ' ''^^^^!£ca5i»^^ 






Annk Shapiiu) 

".( iircnl nii'wnni dues not 
mtikf (I })liil(ts<ii>her anji more 
than a dirtitnifirif can l>f railed 
a ff ram mar,'' 



Marikx Smith 

■•ir.o-A/ Whiit's 'u-ork- Il7;«/v 
haz'c I luard lluif icord htfort'/'' 



F291 





Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 




ViR(;ixiA SrrRMAX 

"Till/ mnilesln'^ « candle tu 
fhif ivrrit." 





Fkaxces Texxent 

'Life h short, death will 
rome: t/o to it yirls, while 
v.ou're iioiinc/." 





KaTHERIX'E THEn.IXG 

•■She will not falter, faint or 
fail, but fit/lit until her rights 
prevail." 





Lavixia Tyi.er 

".s'/ir (V iienlle. .ihe is shji. 
sill Iins mischief in her eije." 




|3(M 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




EULAH VaIGIIX 

•'// work interferes ■with 
[ileasure, cut out the work." 





Ni.NA N'erdery 

"Fur fhi'if love her just the 
same, he she ic'il'l or he she 
tame." 





Martha W'ai.i. 

"What fairt/^like miisie steals 
over the sea, entraiiriiitf our 
senses with .tweet ineloilt/ !" 

Meiiiher \'arsitv '2U, '21. 





Pa I' LINE Watson 

".IwatJ dull care, and I 
jirithee begone from me.' 




[31] 



Class '21 MAIDS aiul A MAX Tuhnuui 



The Ship of One and Twenty 



Goiic bfforL', the class of twenty. 
Pausing now is one and twenty 
For a moment 'ere embarking 
J'or a liopeful hapjjv moment 
On tlie margin of tlie river. 
Now is sunk tlie sun of childhood; 
Risen now the moon of girlhood. 
Shedding soft and silvery moonbeams 
Full of purity and goodness. 
Full of nobleness and honor. 
Drifting down the stream of knowledge 
Past the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, 
Past those stations on our journey 
Where we loved to learn our lessons. 
Learned to love our dear old Tubman, 
Thus it is we leave our schoolmates. 
Those we love and those who love us ! 
iMay the classes wliii-li will follow 
Sail the shining path we sailed o'er: 
Dij) their oars whei'c ours have glistened; 
Follow close our good example ; 
Profit by mistakes which we made — 
That in setting pace for others 
They may raise a higher standard ; 
One which every gii'l is proud of; 
One, an honor to their high school. 
May they often in their mind's eye 
Sec our class ship drifting, floating, 
Sailing down the stream of knowledge 
By the lighthouse, (iraduation. 
Passing from the stream of knowledge 
Out into the si-a beyond it; 

[32] 



Tubman M AIDS and A MAN Clan s 'Jil^ 

From the days of liappy cliildliood 

To tlie hapjiier days of girlhood; 

From tlie days of hooks and lessons, 

To the master. Old Experience — 

Him who teaches best the lessons 

Which in life we all have need of. 

From tlic first we are departed, 

Sailing now into tlie second ; 

At tlie ])ort we give tiic password, 

Whisper just the word "Diploma,' 

Then upon life's stormy ocean. 

On life's sea so rough with billows, 

Sails the Ship of One and Twenty, 

Tossed about by storm and tempest ; 

Battle we against the ocean. 

Fight against the winds and waters. 

But at last we come out Victor — 

Builded, braced, and launched bv Tubman. 

—Nell Russell, "21 . 



[33] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Senior Class History 

1917-1921 



X 



S HISTORY interesting.'' Some history is, particularly American 
historv, because it concerns ourselves and our country. How dry 
history would be without the obstacles that make it ! 



Then, here is a history that is interesting. It i> the Senior Class Historv, 
and is interesting because it concerns ourselves, and our school. The many 
obstacles that tried to trip us merely made us work harder and become stronger. 
For all the advantages the Tubman girls now have we would not give up our 
past four years" experiences, because, we are proud of having conquered those 
years. The harder the victory is to gain, the more victorious we are when 
we've won. 

In 1917, as Freshmen, we joined the Tubman refugees at the First Pres- 
byterian Sunday School building. This was our temjiorary abode after tlie 
big Augusta fire tiiat destroyed Tuhuiaii on Cotton Row. There we were, 
eighty-five in number, homeless and frightened, though we put on a i)old front. 
But we soon caught the spirit of loyalty and walked with a migiitv air, our 
heads held up, and our shoulders back, for were we not Tubmanites.'' Surely, 
everybody must recognize us. 

Indeed, we carried our books with us everywliere we went, and sat witii 
them in our la])s as the sub-freslnnen do now. But wu did it because we had 
no place to put them. Our classes were held in the little class rooms where we 
sat, with our heels hung in the rounds of the chairs, and hugged our knees. 
For nmsic, science, and sewing, we marched across to the Central school and 
spent many ))kasant hours there. 

It was under the hos])itable roof of the First Presbyterian Sunday School 
that we received many visits from soldiers and war-workers who called us to 
patriotism. It is safe to say that they found us ready and willing in every 
instance. 

It is not very often that girU in the South have tlie privilege of attending 
School when the ground is co\ere(l with ice, but wi- did. And our not liaving 
this ])rivilege often accounted for the fact tluit we could not stay right side up, 
or on our feet, long enough to get to school on time. 

About this time, a big, cloudy obstacle came along and stood right in our 
])ath. It was tailed the coal shortage. As I have saiil before, we readily 

|:U] 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 

responded to any patriotic cause, so in Dectniber we g-ladlv discontinued scliool 
for the purpose of stretchiiicf our coal supply. 

Don't think for a minute that we were discouraged because of this obstacle, 
for we had a bright out-look in the future. February, 1918, greeted us at the 
door of the new Tubman on Walton Way. ^Ve have the honor of being the last 
of the refugees, and tlie first to enter our new home. Here we had everything 
that we had lacked before. We di ln"t even mind getting lost between classes 
because the seniors got lost, too. 

In the sewing classes at the new school we put away the embroidery needle 
Hnd stitched away on pajamas and children's dresses for the French people, 
and hospital shirts and gun covers for our soldiers. Maybe some day we shall 

profit by this Red Cross experience. 

Now g-raduation was sometl'.ing- bevond the horizon so far as we were con- 
eerned. and it didn't mean nuich to us. All that mattered, really, was the 
little card the teachers gave us, the last day. that made us Sophomores. We 
were now ninety-five in number in sjiite of tie fact that some of our school- 
mates left school for idleness, work, or matrimony. 

AVhat a hard vear was before us I But, of course, we did not know it. and 
"where ignorance is bliss, 'tis follv to be wise.'' We knew nothing of the girl 
with the thousand eyes, nor Alexander, who might liave warned us. Befove 
Christmas the doors were shut against us for a whole month on account of the 
influenza e]iidenhc : not because Tubman would give us the "flue,' but for fear 
that individuals wcuild jias^ it on to Tubman. Th.en, when we thought all was 
safe, we made another effort to go to school ; but in January, 1919, the epidemic 
proceeded to interrupt the process of our education again, and we almost gave 
up all hopes of ever getting educated. We did not resume our work until 
March of the same year, and. in our dete; niination not to lose the fight, we 
went to school six days in tlie week. Of course that was the plan of the 
Faculty, but they could not have carried it out except for our co-operation. 
.Now. can you think of anything braver than that for a school girl who likes 
to sleep late on Saturday morning'' 

During our Sophomore year a most eventful thing happened prior to all 
epidemics. A man was enlisted on the Faculty I He was neither a young man, 
no:' an old man, but just a middle-aged man. After the excitement was over, 
nothing much happened except that he got married before teaching the 
next year. 

Our Principal is very much o])])osed to school girls" marching through the 
streets on parades, but he said that it was our patriotic dutv tQ do sq when we 

[35] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

were asked to parade to lielp promote the progress of the fifth Liberty loan. 
We thoroughly enjoyed the admiration of tiie public and felt very important 
in doing our duty. 

Well, what do you think.'' The Juniors asked some of our Sophomores to 
serve at the banquet for the Seniors. An honor, indeed ! Nevertheless, when 
■we become Juniors we shall have the same privilege. Of course we can't 
exactly revenge on them because we shall have to ask the Sophomores who come 
after us, but the principle will be revenge just the same. 

Now there are sixty-five of us knocking on the door of the Junior class. 
What a glorious feeling as we stand with our feet on the step of the Junior 
class, and our eyes on the level with the Senior step. Graduation is not merely 
a vision on the horizon now for we have a closer view. We had no interup- 
tion this year, consequently, the rest of our history is dry ; it is so dry now 
that I can hardly jjroceed. Of course we are very glad epidemics deserted us, 
and we are no longer victims of them. We spent the whole year looking for 
more adventures but the war wa.s ended and so was everything else, seemingly. 
Our last resort was the battles fougiit on the iiockey field and basket ball 
court which we didn't always win. I suspect that the lack of something 
to do is what possessed us to make up such a clownish circus. Any way it 
was the kind of thing the public liked because we made four hundred and three 
dollars and thirteen cents and gave the Seniors as good a banquet as we hope 
to have when we're Seniors. 

Now if you want to know why we shout, laugh, cry, and sigh, it is because 
we are Seniors. You don't wonder that we shout and laugh, but you do wonder 
why we cry and sigh. That is the secret of Seniorship, and you must wait 
until you are one before you can find out. We are standing on the top step 
now, but our history is still in the making because we haven't received our 
diplomas yet. We are anxiously waiting and hoping that none of the fifty-four 
will be left behind. 

Already we have witnessed two snows this year which makes us feel that 
we are receiving as cold a farewell as tlie welcome we were given. 

We are glad to be the privileged ones of having seen the Lyceum courses 
introduced into our school, and the many other improvements that have come 
about during our four years here, some of which are: the Honor League, the 
Athletic Council, and the Annual. We are proud of all of them. 

I am sure we feel conscientious in saying that we have done our best in 
every way and in everytliing. We feel kindly and superior to everybody, due 
to our proper training. To say that we have enjoyed the friendship of Mr. 

[361 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 

Hickman is only hinting of our love for him. To say that we have a fatherly 
love for ]\Ir. Garrett is saying everything because we know of his daughtei'ly 
interest in us. To say that we love and respect our Faculty is true, but there 
is no telling what they think of us judging from our montiily reports. 

I fear that I am getting too sad, though, as long as tears are shed, this 
history is not too dry. When I laugh the world laughs with me; but when I 
weep, I weep alone; therefore, I shall leave our history to complete itself. 

— Katherine Tlieiling. 



[37] 



Class 'i^l MAIDS and A MAX Tub) 



Statistics 



e 



— o — 

Most Dcpt'iKlable Katherinc Theilin<; 

Biggest Talker -..- Sara Evans 

Best Dancer -.-- — Caroline Brown 

Prettiest Louise Martin 

Best Xaturcd Bessie Plumb 

INIost I'nku'ky Velni;i Johnson 

Biggest Vocabulary Mallie Morris 

Most Original Anna Ev^ 

Best Stenographer Ida Fogel 

Most Attractive .-.. Gene Greneker 

Most Agreeable Mary Hughes 

Best Complexion Deryl Clark 

Meekest Mary McClure 

Most in Love Margaret Milton 

Most Prominent Irene .Jack -ion 

Best Bookkeeper Mary Rosenblatt 

Most Brilliant Martha Jarrcll 

Cutest Dorothy Robison 

Tyi)ical Senior ...Gladys Couch 

Most Reserved Virginia Sturmaii 

Best Voice Frances Brawncr 

Prissiest Melanie Anderson 

]\I(>st Stylish -•.. Margaret Jones 

JoUiest Bessie Barnes 

Most Obliging Lillie Piatt 

Most Timid A ken Fow ke 

Best Fainter Frances Tennent 

Sweetest Mary Cook 

[38] 



Tubman MAI DS and A MAN • Class '21 

Most Distant Elizabeth Greneker 

Most Conscientious Lucile ]McComnions 

]Most Forgetful Kathleen Rosier 

Sincei-est Annie Evelyn Mever 

IVIost Talented Dornui Blitchington 

Biggest Bluffer Hattie Belle Griffin 

iMost Business-like Katherine Rushing 

j\Iost Ambitious — in school and out (oh. you boys!) Nell Russell 

Most T'nsatisfied Anna Shapiro 

Giggliest Marien Smith 

Most Self-Assured Gertrude iloore 

Most Sensitive Melrose Hamilton 

Most "Made-Up" Eulah Vaughn 

Most Dignified Louise Dye 

Quietest Annie Lou Johnson 

Most Affectionate Nina Verdery 

Most Popular Belle Walker 

Best Sport Pauline ^Vatson 

Noted for Cutting Chapel Isabel Kendrick 

Most Studious Mary Ferguson 

Most Capable Corinee Brown 

Neatest Lavinia Tyler 

Most Indifferent Mary Bostick 

Best Disposition Minnie Fell 

Best Musician Martha Wall 

Best All-Round Margaret McGowan 



[39] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Class Prophecy of 1921 

— o — 

as I walked out Jackson Street with inv two wonder-workers, on the day 
of my arrival in Augusta, my eyes fell upon a sign like this : "Don't 
miss it — three T. H. S. graduates of 1921 will be at the Grand tonight 
only, to tell where their classmates are, and what they are doing." 

Seven long years had passed since I had been in Augusta. When I left, I 
had just graduated from Tubman, and now Gladys, Dorothy and I have 
finished our study of the occult sciences, and other branches of that character. 

On the night mentioned, the curtain rises, and a stage is seen, at the back 
of which are two heavy velvet curtains. Except for two velvet pillows on each 
side of a marble pedestal, the stage is bare. On top of the pedestal is placed 
a crystal which looks as if it might be made of silver. I enter through the 
velvet draperies at the back of the stage. Dorothy and Gladys enter through 
the side doors, one coming from each side. We are all dressed alike, having an 
Oriental costumes, with turbans bound tightly around our heads. My colleagues 
sit on the pillows as do the Arabs, and I stand behind the pedestal. I raise my 
hands in Oriental fashion over the crystal, and gaze into its mystic depths. 
After a space of two minutes, I speak. 

As I look into the crystal I see only a confusion of things. Slowly the 
scene changes, and I discern a sign. "Fancy Dancing — Dye & Clark. ' A 
door opens and I see our old schoolmates, Deryl and Louise. What are they 
doing.'' Goodness, me! DeryPs toe-dancing, and Louise is doing her best to 
make a bashful youtii play the part of Pierrot while Pierrette waits patiently. 
Who would have ever thought that "D. C." and "Louise" would teach dancing.' 

Now, I see something that everyone might well expect. There is Mary 
Cook, dressed as a nurse, and bending over a poor, ragged, deformed child. 
Mary was ever gentle, hence this wonderful welfare work is just the tiling 
for her. 

What is this.'' Flowers every wiiere and in their midst is Hattie Belle. A 
florist? No, Mr. Balk's assistant. The phone rings, and I hear Hattie 
Belle's voice, "Balk's Nursery." It is Sparta, Ga., calling. "What's the 

name please.'' Mr. Yes, this is Miss Griffin! Hello!" Hattie Belle 

recognizes the voice as that of an old friend of hers. He wants some flowers 
to be sent to his wife, who was Miss Lucile McConnnons. Dear old Iaicv ! 
She's living in Sparta and married to — oh, well, ask Hattie Belle. 

Now, I perceive a long brick building. As the crystal reveals it more 
clearly, I recognize it as Tubman. In room 2.5 are seen geometric figures on 
every board. Girls are bending over every desk, and seated at the teacher's 
desk is Isabel Kendrick. She has taken Miss Greene's place teacliing plane geo- 
metry, for now it is necessary to liave a teacher for solid geometry alone. 
Suddenly tlie scene changes to the Gym and I see Annie Evelyn, blowing a slirill 
whistle. A crowd of girls gather around lur immediately. She is basket-hall 
coach and assistant to Miss Ruland who lias returned. 

I see now, on the 800 block of Broad Street, a very attractive sign: "Miss 
Jones' Exclusive French Footwear." At the door stands a girl who looks ex- 
ceedingly familiar to iiie. Siie lias on a smart serge dri'ss and very "Frenchy" 

r40i 



Tubman MAIDS a nd A MAN Class '21 

shoes. Peg Jones! She .surely has a dear Httlo sliop, and, My! how crowded 
it is ! 

My crystal now reveals to me a large dance hall, or rather simply part of 
the dancing room of one of the most pojjular hotels in Xew York. A man and 
a girl come dancing out. How graceful they are! I recognize the girl as 
CaroHne Brown. She and her husband are known as tiie second Mr. and Mrs. 
Vernon Castle. Old C. B. ! Everyone knew when we went to Tubman that 
she was the best dancer in the class. 

The scene shifts now to a street in Atlanta. A building slowly emerges 
which I recognize as the Grand. Posters arc everywhere, and one especially 
attracts my attention. It is of a young woman of perhaps twenty-four or five. 
I read the sign under it. "Miss P^-ances Brawner, an Augusta girl, will sing 
here tonight with Farrar." Goodness! Frances, an opera singer.'' All know- 
she is successful without my saying so. 

What do I see now.? A small country town. It seems that something is up. 
I see "Grovetown" painted over the door. A shout goes up and a young 
woman ascends the platform. She begins to speak. After about five minutes, 
another shout rises. "Hurrah ,for our Mayor!" What on earth.'' Sara 
Evans, mayor of Grovetown.'' I suppose she's just finished making an "oral 
talk," only her audience is diflerent from the crowd of giggling school-girls 
she used to address. 

Just on the other side of Grovetown I observe a farm. A ilear little cot- 
tage is situated on the road-side, and a ])icket-fence surrounds it. On one of 
the posts of the fence is attached a sign which reads, "X'elma Johnson, Scienti- 
fic Farmer." I at once recall a talk that \ elma made during Tubman days on 
"Imported Pests." Now I see why she was so interested in the effect of these 
pests on the cro|)s. 

My crystal now reveals to me another country town. The Post Ott'ice 
looks as if it were merely a small cage. Through the bars of the window I see 
a light-haired girl assorting mail. I recognize her as "Chick." I beg your 
pardon. Miss AUeen Fowke, Post Mistress of her home town Post Office. 

Gazing intently into the crystal, I see, through an open door a Beauty 
Parlor. A young lady is seated at a dressing table on one side of the room. 
Who is that girl who is arranging her hair.'' Sis.'' Why of course! Marien 
Smith. She's dressing the girl's hair in the same style in which she used to 
■wear her own. At another table is a girl who is having her lips painted. I 
recognize the artist as Eulah Vaughn. As the door closed I read the sign 
on it : "Misses Smith and Vaughn, Beuaty Parlors." Sis and Eulah ought 
to be successful ! 

At a distance I see a big white house. It seems to come closer and closer. 
In front of it, I see an automobile. The screen door opens, and a girl comes 
out. She has on a sporty white skirt and coat, a smart hat, and low-heeled 
white Oxfords. In her right hand she holds a silver card-case, and in her left 
I see a — what is that.'' A piece of chocolate cake! She is eating it slowly as 
if it were too good to let go. She descends the porch steps, walks slowly down 
the path that leads to the street and ste|)s into the automobile which I recog- 
nize as an Essex. Can anyone in the audience guess who she is.'' "Nina 
Verdery.''" Why, of course. She's married and evidently happy for she's 
eating chocolate cake and driving an Essex. 

[+11 



Class '21 MAIDS a nd A MAN Tubman 

As I gaze again into my crystal, I see a busy street in a large city. Two 
ratlier tall girls are walking towards nie. One has light hair and a round face. 
She is dressed in an organdie frock with a hat to match. How cool and fresh 
she looks ! The other girl has black hair and a masculine walk. Her costume 
consists of a jilain white shirt-waists and skirt, stiffly starched, a white straw 
sailor, and low-heeled Oxfords. I am sure that I know them. As they come 
closer, I recognize them as Polly Watson and ]Martha \A'all. Our classmates 
are not separated so widely after all, for here are two of the very best friends 
still together, away up in Boston. Martha is teaching piano and voice in the 
Boston Conseryatory, and is yery successful and ha])py. Polly. '^ Why, she 
is now Dr. Watson, the leading woman physician in Boston. Funny old Polly ! 
She always wanted to be a man, and I see that she got as near to it as possible. 

The scene now changes to something yery different from the busy city. I 
behold a lagoon with many moss-covered trees growing in the water and on the 
banks. A canoe floats lazily out near the middle. In it are sitting, or rather 
reclining, a girl and a man. He is playing a guitar; she is reading a book and 
eating ciiocolates. How happy they look ! On tiie girl's left hand I see a 
beautiful solitaire and a band carved in orange blossoms. I've evidently come 
in contact with a recently married couple. The girl looks up and I recognize 
her husband, but I guess "Boo" had rather I would not tell. They are serenely 
ha]i])y, though, as every one can see. 

In my faithful crystal, I see now a moving picture studio in California. 
Thi'ough the door I see a girl with bobbed hair bending over a desk. A man is 
watching her as she signs a three-year contract to play for him. She lays 
the pen down with emphasis and looks up quickly. Gene Grenekcr ! A movie 
actress, and I am sure, a good one, for she siiowed us at Tubman that she 
could act. 

The Masonic Temple in our own town is now distinguished, and in front 
of it stands a "Cole-Areo." A girl and a man run out of a building and almost 
fall into the car. Mallie and — of course, we all know. They're engaged now 
and seem to be very hilarious. This must be the day before their wedding! 

My crystal ajipears cloudy again, so I shall turn it over to my assistant, 
Dorothy, who will tell you of her section of our class of '21. 

I, in my turn, walk slowly up to the crystal. A hush falls on the audience 
as I begin to speak and tell them what I see in the mystic ball. 

The first scene shows me the picture of a large ballroom. I recognize the 
central figure as Xell Russell, now the wife of one of the "big" men in Wash- 
ington. Xor does she spend all her time in the ballroom, but in the clubs and 
various charitable organizations. She very plainly shows how iiappy she is 
and what a success her marriage has been. 

But the next picture is the very o))i)osite of the first one. I see a room in 
a tenement. The furnishings are poor and scanty. On a bed in tile corner 
lies a woman, and another woman is bending over her. I instantly recognize 
^lary Hughes, doing nuich goo<l as a settlinient worker in Atlanta. 

Next I see a lecture room crowded with intelligent looking people. They 
are attentively listening to Anna Eve reading a selection from her latest book. 
After the reading she gives a short lecture on the best modern fiction. Anna 
is a very successful no\elist and is considtTed fliroughout tlu> country an a\i- 
t^ority on literature. 

[42] . 



Tuhman MAIDS and A MAX Class '£1 

I see now a large gymnasium in a school in San Francisco. A teacher is 
superintending a game of basket-ball and when she turns around I recognize 
Mary Bostick. Slie has followed her talent and has a job that is mere play 
to her. 

Next I see the House of Representatives in session. ^VIlo is that speaking.'' 
Ail! yes. Belle Walker introducing a bill into the House. She is the first 
woman representative from Georgia. From reports she seems to be doing as 
vrell as any of the men that have jirecedeil her. 

The next scene is entirely (hfferent from any of the ])receding ones. I see 
a large aeroplane alight in a fielii. I see the aviator get out. But. no I It's 
an aviatrix. At first it is rather hard to recognize Irene Jackson in her smart 
leather uniform. She is driving the mail-plane between New York and Chicago. 
It seems rather strange tliat Irene would take up this branch of work, but then 
she always was a high-flier ! 

Now I see a busv office. Teacliers are coming and going. There is a 
meeting in the office. In the central figure I recognize Mary Ferguson, now 
President of Smith College. Although ]Mary is very efficiently filling her 
position, she has a few spare hours. She has contributed this time to writing 
and has produced Ferguson s First Year Latin, Caesar, Cicero, Virgil and a 
Latin Grammar. I hear that she is now working on a Latin Dictionary. As 
these books excel those of Mr. Charles E. Bennett, they are now being used 
in all of the best schools. 

Next, I perceive a large opera house crowded to overflowing. On the stage 
I see Martha Jarrell standing with her violin in her hantl, charming her audi- 
ence by her wonderful music. Nor is this ^lartiia's only interest, for, at the 
piano, accomj)anying her, is one who takes up a great deal of her time — 
lier husband. 

The next time my crystal changes, I find myself back at Tubman. I take 
a peep in Room 20 and I see a teacher occupying Miss Flisch's chair. Her 
pupils listen attentively as slie says, "Now. girls, remember, liistorv is not 
made : it grows." I then recognize Lavinia Tyler, following religiously in the 
foot-steps of her predecessor. 

As I pass Room 27, I hear a distressed voice saying: "Mais, mes cheres.'' 
It is Mary McClure, returned to Tubman to teach French after several years 
in a French Academy. 

As I go by the Library, much larger than it was in the days we went there, 
I see Virginia Sturman. Since the school and the Library are both much 
larger, Virginia has quite a strenuous job. She took a course at Pratt Insti- 
tute and altho" ottered a better position, could not resist the temptation to 
come back to good old Tubman. 

Now I see a young girl, in crisp, white organdy, hurrying out of an auto- 
mobile. She is accompanied by a young Apollo in white flannels. They are 
iiurrying because they are late to a tea given at the Countrv Club in their 
honor. It is a week before their wedding and Frances Tennent and — oh! well, 
never mind — are "rushed" to the full extent of that ex))ressive word. 

I see next a young woman, in a j)lainly tailored suit, getting on a train. 
It is Lily Piatt on her way to a convention in Washington. Lily's time is com- 
pletely taken up by politics, and it is rumored that she will be the next candi- 
date for the Mayor of Augusta. 

.[43] 



Class "21 MAIDS and A MAX Tubman 

Tlie next scene is the gayest of all. It is Carnival week in Paris. The 
Queen of the Carnival is Paris" latest adored dancer. It is Margaret ^IcGowan, 
dressed in a gav costume, dancing her way into the hearts of the French people. 

And so, as the fairy books say, "I \w\w they will all live haj)pily ever 
afterwards." 

Now it is Gladys' turn to display her knowledge of the occult. 

Well, tJie last jjart of our performance will now take ])lace and I will en- 
deavor to locate all tlie senior "C's" of the class of '21. In the crystal I see 
Augusta. This probably means that the majority of the girls are still in this 
town. Dear old senior "C", it always was slow to move even in the days of 
campaigns, drives, parades, circuses, plays and honor leagues, and I am not in 
the least surprised at the biggest part of it still being in Augusta. Some 
people said that we didn't have the spirit, but I, being one of the class, can say 
that the spirit was there, only we were just slow and sure. 

Now for individuals. As I gaze into the crystal I see a dark-haired girl 
bidding goodbye to a tall man. What.'' Gertrude Moore, as sure as can be, 
bidding goodbye to her "useter-be-medical-student-lover" who is now her doctor- 
husband. I see, by the gleam in her eyes, that she is extremely ha])py. 

Soon the scene cluinges to a road. Wiiat road.'' Why, the Milledgeville 
road, to be sure! In the middle of tiie road is a Ford cut-down, blue with 
yellow wlieels, and — but wait. The short, ))lum]) little chautt'eur is Minnie 
Goldie Fell and at this instant she is cranking that Ford with all her might. 
It is rather late for jMinnie to be traveling, but I see in the crystal ball that 
she has been in that exact spot for one hour and a half. There has evidently 
been a blowout. 

INIilledgeville road remains in the crystal, but to one side there now ajipears 
a prettv, green bungalow. At the back door there stands a plump littltjwoman 
in a bungalow apron. Her innnediate occupation is throwing feed to chickens. 
Rather late, I say, to be feeding chickens and they nnist have been hungry or 
they would have gone to bed without their supper. Ah! I ])erceive a cause 
for this untimely feast. Do you remember my telling you of the little Ford 
cut-down.'' Well, Minnie Goldie has s])ent the day witii her who used to be 
IVIelrosc Hamilton and was on iier way home awhile ago. These two class- 
mates of mine have obtained their heart's desire for Melrose always wanted a 
sweet, little bungalow with a latticed porch, and Minnie always said that she 
■was going to buy herself a flivver when she got a job. 

Again I gaze into my crystal. This time I see two girls walking briskly 
U]) Broad Street. One, I discover is Ida Fogel. The other is Mary Rosen- 
blatt. They both are on their way home from work. Ida is head steno- 
gra})her in the New Biscuit Comi)any of Augusta, and Mary is bookkeeper in a 
large department store of this same city. I could have guessed this without 
gazing into the ball, for Ida broke all the speed laws in taking dictation during 
school days and Mary's bookkee])ing always was perfect, even to the checking. 

Ah! At very close range, looms the face of Katherine Rushing. I believe 
that she is at this instant sitting up in the "Peanut Gallery." Am I not right.'' 
"Yes,"' you say. Well, well, old "Shorty," I guess that by associating with 
me in your youth you formed the habit of haunting the "roost." I see in the 
crystal that you are at present keeping house foi- your brothers and sisters. 
Well, you will be kee])iiig house for someone else \-erv soon. 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 

I now have a vision of a school room. The teaclier is none other than 
Kathleen Rosier. Her subject is history. I am not surprised for Kathleen 
always had a lot of knowledge that no one knew of. I see that she is loved 
by all of her scholars. 

Again I look into the crystal. This time I see a shij) just landing at New 
York. The gang plank is thrown down and who do you suppose are the first 
two who walk down it.' Why Elizabeth Greneker and Dornia Blitchington, 
and they have just returned from research work in Germany, hunting the late 
Mrs. Hohenzollern's fur coat which was lost during her flight into Holland 
You want to know whether they were successful or not. Well, if you must 
know, you will have to read the Augusta Herald, for I am not going to say. 

I said at the beginning that nearly all of my class was in Augusta, but now 
I see that there are few rolling stones. In the crystal I see a street that I 
remember very distinctly as being in Alabama. A large white house, built colo- 
nial style, stands on the northern side of the street. Tonight there is a fete 
on the beautiful lawn tiiat surrounds this stately house. The hostess is Miss 
Melanie Anderson. I presume that she is back in her beloved Alabama. 

The scene changes to New York City, and to the Knickerbocker Hotel. 
In the dining room sit Miss Anne Shapiro and Miss Margaret ^lilton. The 
brilliant lig'hts shine on tiie mass of beautifullv dressed women and the bri<rht- 
ness of their gems da/zle your eves. Anne is in New York buying for the 
Shapiro's Fifth Avenue Hat Shoj). Margaret is a model in tiiis prosperous 
business and she is witii Anne to iielp in the buying. Tliey appear to have 
no thoughts of business on their minds, hut are deej) in the gayeties of the 
evening. 

Now in tiie crystal ball, I see a face that closely resembles Corinee Brown. 
Those of you who ai'e here tonight are interested in knowing where dear old. 
impulsive Corinee is. Well, she and Bessie Barnes are making a tour of the 
important cities of the South with a ^'audeville company of their own. They 
are at present in Langley, South Carolina. The money which they make is 
for the benefit of the starving cats of North Augusta. You see, Corinee is 
just as generous as ever, always thinking of otiiers. And Bessie is just as 
small and graceful as ever, for her part in the vaudeville is an exquisite toe 
dance. 

And now I have only two more to locate. On the corner of Walton Way 
and ^letcalf Street stands a new house. It is exactly opposite the home of 'Sir. 
and Mrs. F. W. Theiling. In the city is a young man waiting for the girl of 
his dreams, who has been on mission work in China, to return and take charge 
of this new house. This man is a young minister and his bride-elect is none 
other than my dear chum. Katherine Theiling. ilay his love for her be as 
great as that of the little heathen children of China ! 

Next door to this new house is another house that became a home on June 

11. 1921. The mistress of this home is Mrs (nee Annie Lou 

Johnson). Well. I am very glad that I didn't bet on who would be the first 
"C" to marry, for I would never have bet on Annie Lou. But, never-the-less, 
the empty lot that used-to-be now harbors two of my classmates. 

AVell, now, %ve do not try to make you believe that we are extraordinary folks, but anyone 
who will make a study of the crystal ball can see exactly what we have seen. We hope that 
you are satisfied with our performance and feel that you have received your uioney"s worth. 

We thank you. 

[45] 



Class '£1 MAIDS and A MAX Ttibi 



Last Will and Testament 



City of Augusta, 
State of Georgia, 
County of Riclmiond. 

To All Whom It May Concern. Witnesscth — 

We, the Senior Class of 1921, being of sound and disposing nnnd and 
memory, realizing the proximity of dissolution, tlo make and declare this as 
our last will and testament, revoking all other wills heretofore matle bv us. 

The Senior Class of 1921 be(jueaths to the beloved class of 1922 their so- 
called Senior dignity and their many privileges, hoping that the said legatees 
will u])hold the jirestige of our school. 

To Edna Agee, Irene Jackson leaves her athletic talents. 

To Marguerite Scott, ]\lartha Wall leaves her position as school pianist. 

To Margaret HIitcliington, IJessie IMvunb beijueaths some of her height, 
hoping that the said legatee will fully appreciate this sudden uplift into 
tlie world. 

To Bessie Wright, Katherine Theiling beijueaths some of her shorthand 
and typewriting knowledge. 

To Avice Smith, Sara Evans leaves the art of chewing gum in classes 
witliout being detected. 

To Elise \'an I'elt, Nina Verderv leaves some of her abundant growth 
of hair. 

To Pauline Hai'din, Corinee Brown beijueaths her love for the I'niversitv 
of Georgia, hoping that the said legatee will keep (Georgia's standard raised. 

Isabel Kendrick leaves to any .Iimioi' who has the hvjjnotic power to caj)- 
ture insects, the position of chief bug coUectoi- of the Biology class. 

To Melville Doughty, Alleen Fowke bequeaths her stentorian voice and 
boisterous laugh, hoj)ing that the said legatee's soft voice and modest laugh 
will be improved. 

Anne Shapiro leaves to any .Junior, who is not satisfied with Ikm- grades, 
her persuasive powers, hojiing that said legatt'e u ill highlv prize this noble 
endowment. 



Tubman M AIDS and A MAN Class '21 

To Dessic Kuhlke, Maricn Smith leaves her knowledge of the French 
language. 

To Mary Henry, Polly Watson leaves her noisy manners, hoping that 
Marv's (juiet disposition will he improved. 

To Sarah Simmons, Deryl Clark leaves her ineffacable grin. 

To P^lorence White, Dorma Blitchington leaves her art talents. 

To Annie B. Daniels, Martha Widl lea\es her skill in l)lutl'ing the suscej)t- 
ible male.s. 

To Dessie Kuhlke, Mary Ferguson leaves the henna hue of her hair. 

To \'era McGowan, Anna Eve leaves her awe-inspiring goggles. 

To Mr. Garrett, Mary Bostick leaves "the Ford, " trusting that the exer- 
cise involved in cranking will ])rove beneficial to his health. 

To Edna Hutchinson, Martha Jarrelh leaves her Virgil book with helpful 
interlinear notes. 

(Signed) SENIOR CLASS OF 1921, 
Witnesses: Gene Grcneker, Testator. 

Dorma Blitchington, 
Belle Walker, 
Frances Brawncr. 



[47] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



"Sad, But True" 



ONCE there was a high school girl who thought that the world was too 
cruel for her to live in. In order to get out of it, she decided to take 
her life. In case one of the implements of death might fail her, she got 
a pistol, some matches, kerosene, a boat, a rope and some poison. 

The sun found her up before he was tiie next morning. Grabbing up her 
weapons, she ran down to the ri\er bank. 

After she had pushed out into the water, she proceeded with her plans. 
Tying the rope around her neck ; drinking the poison ; jjouring the kerosene 
over her clothing; striking a match to the kerosene; she pulled the trigger. 

Her head was so hard that the shot bounced olf and cut the rope which 
caused her to drop into the water, thus putting out the fire. All this excite- 
ment made her so sick that she vomitted up the poison and swam to shore with 
a better feeling toward school life. 

— F. White. 



[48] 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 

From T. H. S. to A. R. C. 

(Apologies to "Wearers of the 'E', E. H. S., 1920) 
— o — 

On the record of years tliat have past. 

There is written full many a name 
Of schools that liave come and gone 

And have won great glory and fame ; 
And of those who have passed on their way, 

There are many of highest degree. 
But distinction is given by us 

To the best^the A. R. C. 

Again we must add to this line 

The highest record of fame, 
That never a battle is lost, 

But the boys are always game ; 
They have striven, tliey've fought for the school; 

Their reward a great lionor should be, 
So we place them among the choice band. 

Those boys of the A. R. C. 

They have workeil, they liave trained, they have won, 

And for what liave they eagerly fought? 
It is truly an honor to know 

The gaining for which they have fought. 
When a regiment of boys in blue 

Parades dd^vn the street, you see 
A smile on each Tubman girl's face. 

Her pride for the A. R. C. 

And in the years that are yet to appear 

May our school be renowned as before ; 
May our athletes repeat on the field 

The success which has crowned them of yore. 
And our spirit will remain as it is. 

With wishes as true as can be. 
That glory, unspotted, will cling 

To the boys of the A. R. C. 

— Melville Doughty, '22. 
[49] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAX Tubi 



To the Seniors 



Flowers and songs of cheer announce tlie Spring, 
When every thing takes on a life that's new ; 

The birds resume tiieir song of love and joy, 
And violets awake to drink the dew. 

So tiius, in Spring, a life that's new awaits 

Those wiio must pass into the world of strife, 

Until they've earned their way unto the Gates 
Where God the Father grants eternal life. 

Seniors, the Spring of your life work lias come; 

Your days of childhood's carefree joys are o'er. 
And you must, in your new world yet awake 

To joys and sorrows ne'er thought of before. 

But it is not alone you enter thus. 

For all good wishes do from us arise ; 

Especialh' from the class that takes ^-our place — 
God-speed your each and every enterprise. 

— jMelville Doughty, '22. 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



Junior Class 



Colors — (xrci'ii .111(1 Wliito Flower — Wliih' Hose 

Motto— B' 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Rosa n El, Bi'kch Pre side lit 

Anna Ki.izauktii Branch Vice-President 

Lucv \Vatkixs Seeretarij mid Treasurer 

As It Might Have Been 



XT WAS a woiuk'rful day during the final (.'xaiiis at Tubman. Since 
Kthel is a rather studious girl, she had a week's vacation. That explains 
wiiy she and her faithful, big, shepherd dog, Lvon, were taking a hike 
over hills and valleys that lovely afternoon. She couldn't take such a hike in 
just any kind of Weather(s). 

Ethel is the kind of girl you look at the second time. Not because she's 
strikinglv beautiful, but because of those big, understandable Brown eves, that 
make you feel that you know her, even if you have never seen her before. Her 
Brown hair is indeed her "crowning glory," and sets off her splendid complexion 
to a good advantage. Siie looked es])ecially charming that afternoon in her 
Brown s])ort coat, hose and tramping shoes to match, a fresh White middy 
suit and White tarn. 

Her mother, standing in the Hall as Ethel was coining from the Kitchen 
with her lunch, thought for the one hundred and second time of the statement 
a AVise old man had made when Ethel was quite small, "I predict for her a 
wonderful Carerc." 

As Ethel and I^yon were going out the gate, she had a pleasant word for 
Henry, the Gardner. He said, "Oil! ]\Iiss Ethel, come over here and look at 
the nest our little Wren has built in the Twiggs of the Burch tree.'' After 
carefully examining the nest with Henry, she told him to Scattergood seeds 
and crumbs so that the Wren and all the other birds could have a Merrj' feast. 

[53] 



Class '21 M AIDS and A MAN Tubman 

Passing on, Etliel and I^von climbed tiie Clmrcliill and crossed the Heath. 
She saw a strange looking wagon with a funny little Traylor. in which were 
seated two old women. Either because of her pleasant manner or through 
curiosity, she spoke to the old man who sat in the wagon and drove. When 
she said, "Good evening," he j)ulled the lines and said, "Whoa ! Clarke." Ethel 
learned from him that he was a ililler, who was carrying to town the flour that 
he had taken as toll. She asked whicii woman was his wife. He pointed to 
one of them. 

Ethel then inquired, "Who is that.'" jJointing to the other woman. 

"My wife, I told you," he replied. 

Ethel laughed and said, "Either you misunderstood me, or you must be 
a Mohrman." 

Then one of the women said, "Aw, Daniel, you make her think you have 
two wives. ' 

As Ethel went on, she saw a rablnt run under a Bush. Picking up a Stone, 
she threw it at the rabbit. It darted out in front of her, and Lvon had a 
nice Chase after it. 

"Great Scott !" exclaimed little pickaninnies who were sitting by the road 
as Ethel passed. "Yore dog c'n most Skinner rabbit; can't he Miss.'' Say! 
Here's where you c'n get some 'Simmons when frost falls." 

Ethel began to jjick her way llirinigh the Marsh. Beyond this is the 
Branch beside which is a ])ath Ethel has made in going to her "Secret nook," 
as she calls it. From this cliff she could command a view of the prettiest na- 
tural scenery in the country. She was climbing the rocks quickly, and even 
Lyon was eagerly bounding from one rock to the next, as if he knew where he 
was going. 

The secret nook is situateil so that it can not be seen until you stej) on to it. 

But wjien she gained the last step, she Ijcheld a tall young man. verv hand- 
some, with his black hair, blue eyes, and healthy complexion. Before him was 
an easel, on which was a sunset scene, almost finished. In one hand was a 
palette and in the otiier a brush. 

"Oh ! er — ex — excuse me,'' Ethel stannnered. "I thought no one else knew 
about the secret nook." 

A Hglit seemed to be dawning in his eyes, and he dropped the ])alette and 
brush. "You must be Ethel Carew. tiie girl I've heard a certain \Vi>e old 
gentleman speak of so nnich. I"\e always felt that I knew you and have 
wanted to meet you." 

[3+] 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 

"Surely you're not the wonderful artist, Eugene Fatten, who has been 
painting from scenery near Augusta, and whom everyone knows through the 
papers! Of course your face looked familiar, but I couldn't place vou. It's 
because I've seen your picture so often in the paper. Oil ! there's the Cannon 
at the Arsenal. I promised mother I'd be on my way home l)y this time. I 
must go, for I try to do Wrigiit and not tell a Story." 

"The sun is gone and I can't do any more work this afternoon," he said. 
"So. if vou'll allow me, I will lielp you down." 

In short, it came to this, "Dear, putting it in everyday English, I want 
you to be my private Taylor, and everything else, and Patch my clotlies — and 
— everyth " 

Suddenly Ethel awoke to find that it was almost ilark, that she was in 
Study II, and that her Englisli and Latin books were on her desk, open where 
she had been studying for those awful final exams. Mose was standing at her 
elbow saying, "Miss, you must have been asleep : it's nearly dark and I've closed 
up everything.' 

— Edna Hutciiinson, '22. 



|5«| 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tuhman 



Spring 



Ah! Spring is sweet, tra la, tra la, 

Ah ! Spring is sweet, so sweet ! 
When your teacher decides to spring a test. 
And you — well, you can guess the rest — 

Ah ! Spring is sweet ! 

Ah! Spring is sweet, tra la, tra la, 

Ah ! Spring is sweet, so sweet ! 
With fear and trembling you expect a "C" 
And that teacher "ups and springs" a "B" — 

Ah! Spring is sweet ! 

Ah! Spring is sweet, tra la, tra la, 

Ah ! Spring is sweet, so sweet ! 
When someone is born in the midst of the fray. 
And the principal "springs" a half-holiday. 

Ah ! Spring is sweet ! 

Ah! Spring is sweet, tra la, tra la. 

Ah ! Spring is sweet, so sweet ! 
With exemption beyond your farthest dreams. 
And "sprung" on report can! a "B+" gleams. 

Ah! Ain't Spring sweet? 

— Melville B. Doughty. 



I«6| 



ART 




Class '^1 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



A Musical Romance 



Yp^ER name was "Irene"; he was "A Rambling Wreck from Georgia Tech." 
X-l Tiiey met "In Avalon" ; they danced "The Nauglity Waltz." He took 
her to "The Big Show.'' In the show they were "Whispering." He 
called her "Love of Mine" ; he said, "If You Could Care." She : "I Love You 
Truly." He: "Your Eyes Have Told Me so." She: "Hold Me." Before 
leaving he said, "You'er a Million Miles from Nowhere, When You're One 
Little Mile from Home.' 

She spent her time "Waiting" ; for she was "Lonesome — That's All." She 
had the "Blues." When he didn't write, she shed "Tears of Love." She felt 
"Nobody Knows and Nobody Seems to Care." She said, "Why Should I 
Build Castles in the Air.^'' They met again "I'nderneath the Georgia Moon," 
"In Apple Blossom Time." 

He: "I'll Be Hapjiy When the Pr/jacher Makes You Mine." She: "In a 
Kingdom of Our Own," "We'll Let the Rest of the World Go By." 

Thev had "A Dream of Heaven.'' She married in "An Alice Blue Gown.' 
They went on a "Honeymoon" to "Their Isle of Golden Dreams," "Where the 
Lanterns Glow." 

They returned "When the Cherry Blossoms Fall." They called their 
home "Love Nest." The maid's name was "Mandy.' Their children were 
named "Freckles' and "Peggy-"' They sang them to sleep by "Japanese Sand- 
man." They slept in "Pajamas." 

Their last song together was "Our Yesterdays." When she was dying, he 
said "I Hate to Lose You.'' After she died he said, "I Want My Old Girl 
Back." He missed her especially in the "Evening." 

But later he began "Jazzing the Blues Away." Then he met "Margie" — 

"Oh ! You Ain't Heard Nothing Yet !" 

— Frances Tenneiit and Margaret JNlcGowan. 



rss] 





C^^\x^ ,SX Ow^>.v^ Jv,.sj?( ^ 



t .N r> f-H *. "^ X t 



WHORE 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 



Sophomore Class 



— o — 

Colors — Red ;iiid Wliite Flower — Red Poppy 

Motto — To Do. Not to Drcpiiii : to Be Not to Seem. 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Cecilia Baker President 

AxABEL Powell Vicc-Prcsiilent 

J.\xiE ToMJiixs Secretin- 1) and Treasurer 



Time 



We entered by the Fresliiiiaii gate — 
How wise tile Seniors looked I 

Coidd we attain that wondrous pose 
By stuilying of mere book.s? 

We gazed awiiile: then studied hard 

To seek elusive fame. 
To prove to those wise Seniors 

We were only '"Fresh" in name. 

We entered on our Sophomore year. 

Athletics call is loud. 
We'll come near whij)ping the Seniors 

In any basket-ball crowd. 

In two more vears: how can it be 
Time will have flown so fast.-' 

We'll he enrolled as Seniors then 
And stantl on the heights at last. 



-Elnora Bennett, '23. 



(Gil 



Class ''21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Ode to A Senior 



"Oh ! I am so mad. Heard a Senior talking about us tiie other day, 
calling us just Sophomores. I just want to tell 'her' right now, we are no 
longer babies — we are tliird classmen; and yet, they call us 'Wise Fools,' 'Sour 
Grapes !' They're mad because they don't know anything themselves and 
jelous because we do. Leave it to the Sophomores ; they'll find out everything 
worth looking for. Why did T. Harry put us in the balcony.'' Tell us that. 
I'll tell you. He put us there, so when he had visitors it would be an easy 
matter to point out the 'bright' class of the school. Have you noticed that 
you never hear the Sophomores spoken of? Tiiat's because we keep our brains 
for good purposes and don't waste them on nothing. Gee ! But there are 
going to be some dead Seniors arovuid this school if thev don't stoj) saving, 
'She doesn't count; she's only a Soph.' Just you wait. Senior dear, we'll get 
even with you yet ! Just see if we don't. The idea of calling US mere babies !" 

— Janie Tommins, '23. 



[62] 




c^^P 



HOUSEHOLD-ARTS 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Waiting 



Little Miss Plump sat on tiie Stump, 

A-\vaiting a lift, one day; 
When a speeder espied her and drew up beside her. 

And both of them beat it away ! 

* * * * 

When Two-ten comes and we pile out 
Towards home by various ways. 

It is the unexpected lift 

That brightens all our days. 

And when it happens we have spent 

Our seven cents for lunch. 
With joy we see an auto stop. 

And pick u]) all the bunch. 

And so the verdict of tlie girls 

And teaciiers of our school. 
Is that the cars that take us home 

Go by this ancient rule : 

Handsome is as handsome does, 

With cars both great and small ; 

Tlie rattling Ford that picks us up 
Is handsomest of all ! 

—Martha Jarrell, '21. 



[641 





FRESHMAN 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'i 



Freshman Class 



Colors — Blue and White Flower — Blue and White Sweet Peas 

Motto — Big Oaks from Little Acorns Grow 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Marian Andrews President 

Elizabeth Kreps Vice-President 

Katherine Schumacher Secretary and Treasurer 



The Freshman Class 

— o — 

We have no victories, records, dates, 
We are no sweet girl graduates. 
We make no excuses. 
For pluck produces, 
Freshman defiant. 
And self-reliant. 



-K. Crawford. 



[6T] 



Class '£1 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



An Old Faded Fan 



XN a secluded part of France stands a very ancient and old-fasliioned 
castle, known as the "Chateau Dc Berfrareaux." There for many cen- 
turies nobles and ladies have held their follies and enjoyed the luxuries 
of the old French monarchy. And, at the time my story begins, this castle 
was occupied by Lord Francis De Bergareaux, his motiier, and his lovely 
sixteen year old daughter, Stephanie. 

One day Stephanie, roaming about at her own sweet will among the ances- 
tral relics in the attic, came across an old faded fan. She picked the fan up 
and, examining it carefully, found that it was rather dusty and faded. She 
could not help admiring it, iiowever, for it was a very beautiful fan, indeed. 
Stephanie stood silent for a while and wondered where the fan could have come 
from and to whom it belonged. She finally ran down tiie attic stairs to find 
her grandmother, and pulling her out on tiie large veranda, seated her com- 
fortably, sat down by her, and then said in a connnanding tone: 

"If grandmother De Bergareaux loves Stephanie just a little bit, she will 
tell her the story of this faded fan." And as she spoke she waved the fan 
back and forth as if she were some noble lady at a rich ball. Grandmother De 
Bergareaux looked first at Stephanie and then at the fan, the latter being the 
one that brought tears to her eyes. 

"Stephanie," she began, "the history of this fan is a very sad one, but just 
the same grandmother De Bergareaux will tell it to you." And so she did. 

"It was on the night of a gay festival,'' she began. "All the lords and 
ladies were having a merry time. I was at home keeping watch over you, dear 
Stephanie, while your mother and father were enjoying themselves at the festi- 
val. It is said that your mother lost her fan on the way to the ball, and on 
entering the ball room she also lost her ring. The festival continued on 
through the night and everyone was having a lovely time. Finally, a lovely 
gentleman walked up to your mother and asked if he might speak with her a 
few moments. He was told that he could, so your motlier and the handsome 
gentleman walked out of the ballroom and out on the veranda — and there the 
man told her that he had found a ring, and he had been notified that it be- 
longed to her. She thanked him greatly and told him that she had also lost 
her fan. He expressed his regrets and left her. Later your father was walk- 
ing on the veranda, and all of a sudden he heard a ruffling noise, and looking 
behind him he saw two men struggling over a black object. He approached 

[68] 



ruhman MAIDS and A MAN Class "21 

them, and as he did, he discovered that they were fighting over the beautiful 
fan that vour motlier liad lost. He jumped for it, and as he did so, two re- 
ports from a revolver were heard, and all three men dropped dead. Tlie 
nobles and ladies rushed out of the ballroom and out on the veranda and there 
they found the three dead men and the fan. But no one knew who had done 
the shooting, until later years. The three dead men were your fatlier, the 
handsome gentleman tliat had found your mother's ring, and an unknown rob- 
ber. The handsome gentleman was jealous of your mother and when he saw 
the opportunity lie shot at your father and in one shot hit the robber and 
your father, and then the robber, half conscious, shot the handsome gentle- 
man. But I daresay I must not call him a gentleman any more. And that is 
liow all three of them were killed in two shots. And your mother, poor dear, 
grieved herself to death because she knew that siie and her fan were tile cause 
of your father's death. And then you, dear Stephanie, were left in the care of 
your father's brother and me. And Lord Francis De Bergareaux that you 
iiave been calling father for so long is only your uncle." 

■'Oh," cried Stephanie, "Oh, grandmother, how awful, how dreadful! I 
liate the horrid fan, I hate the horrid fan," ami at that she tore u]i into a mil- 
lion pieces the famous faded fan that had been kept in the old castle for sixteen 
vcars or more. And never again did the wise Stephanie go near the ancient 
attic, and what is more, she hates all fans, especially faded ones. 

— Virginia Mobley. 



[89] 



Class '^1 MAIDS and A MAN Tubi 



It Isn't Always Easy- 



To win fame. 

To pass exams. 

To follow advice. 

To think correctly. 

To hold vour temper. 

To "try, try, again." 

To profit by mistakes. 

To keep from giggling. 

To be a dignified Senior ! 

To work difficult problems. 

To abstain from criticizing. 

To write prize-winning essays. 

To win every basket-ball game. 

To study every afternoon, or night. 

To observe all rules for study hall. 

To stick to your Honor League pledge. 

To keep from encoring "By the Waters of Minnetonka.' 

To sit still when sulphurous odors float downward from Lab. 

To refrain from clapping when Mr. Garrett announces a holiday. 

To recite when all you know is that Balboa invented ice in 558. 

—BUT IT PAYS ! 

— Annie E. Meyers, '21. 



ITOI 




-55!-^ 



5UB 
FRCSHMAN 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



Sub-Freshman Class 



— o 

Colors — Purple and Gold Flower — Pansy 

Motto — Through thu Dust to the Stars 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Eleaxor Browx President 

Martha Lester Vice-President 

Ida Wall .'. Sec ret ar// and Treasurer 



A "Sub-Freshman" 



'VERYTHIXG has to lK-<--iii with sonicthin.., uven hio- floods. At fi:-st 
the stream is small and then it swells and swells and finally it overflows. 
That is like high-school. It starts with a little Sub-Freshman, and 
then we learn more and more and finally we graduate. 

The other classes look upon a Sub-Freshman as nothing. I wonder what 
the Sophomores would do if they didn't have the Sub-Freshman to tease and 
pester.'' And the Juniors and Seniors, what would the// do if they didn't have 
the Subs to have "crushes'" on them, and write poems about them? What 
about the Freshmen.'' They don't say nmch because they are not much better 
than we are. 

We are certainly jjroud to think what a grand school Tubman is, and we 
little Sub-Freshmen are at the bottom of it all ! 

—Elizabeth Storv. '25. 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



What Would Happen If-- 

Mr. Garret could crank a Ford? 

Miss Smith left off' her duster? 

Senior "B" loved "A'' and "C"? 

Senior "C" loved "A" and "B"? 

Senior "A" loved "B" and "C? 

Miss Holley ignored the blonds? 

Miss Lorman said "My Heavens!"? 

Myra Hilton kept her mouth shut? 

Margaret Jones lost her paint-box? 

Mary Bostick agreed? 

Minnie "Fell"? 

Belle Walker opened her mouth? 

Martha Jarrell "cussed"? 

Miss Eve paid for her lunch? 

A young man came to Tubman? 

Polly got a demerit? 

The Grenekers stayed for "gym"? 

Catherine Theiling could be seen "Rushing'? 

"Sis" Smith lost her rats? 

Miss Comey walked slow? 

Miss Lorman lost her handkerchief? 

"Miss Plunkett" failed to change her brogue when 
talking to an audience? 

M'lle could translate Irene's French? 



rrti 



THE HDNOK 
LEA CUE 




CUTTINC Orr DISHdNESir 



u 

CATHtH/«fJ««<. 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Honor Council 

Miss Louise Parks — Faculty Representntive 

Amelia Mohkmax Junior liepresentative 

Mary Ferguson Senior Kf present ative 

Mary Kirki.and Suh-Freshiiian He present titixr 

Ethel Miller SopJioinore Representntive 

Margaret Lockhart Freslnnan Re present a tix<e 

Dessie Kuhlke Viee-President 

Martha Jarrell President 



[76! 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class ''21 



The Honor League 



O 



HE Honor League, as its name inijilies, deals witli the lionor of tlic 
school. The League was organized in March, 1920; therefore it is a 
\erv new institution of Tuhnian. 



Tile election ot ofJ'icei s of tile Honor League take^ |ilace one week after 
mid-year exams of each year. A president is chosen from the Junior class and 
a secretary from the Sophomore class. The president is assisted hv a council 
which is com])osed of a rejire-ientative from each <if the five classes, and a 
faculty advisor elected by the faculty. 

The pur])ose of tl'.e Honor League is to raise the standard of the school, 
by eliminating all forms of dishoiiestv in Tubman. Only those students who 
sign the league pledge are recognized as members of the League. The ])le.lge 
IS as follows : 

I will not cheat. 

I will not help others to cheat. 

I will use my influence against cheating. 

In comjiarison with the number of students oi Tubman there have been few 
rejiorted to the League for dishonesty. In each case the council met with the 
offender and used such means as iccrc nccessari/ to meet the situation. 

In December of 19"2() the council made a drive for the purpose of increasing 
the membership roll as well as arousing interest and enthusiasm throughout the 
student body. The drive was begun with a debate on the subject : "Resolved 
that it is worse to give than to recei\e help." Miss Eve and ^liss Burch who 
gave the affirmative side of the debate were the opponents of ^liss Kelly and 
Miss Couch. The judges decided in favor of the negative, but as a matter of 
fact neither side jiroved the winner, as the ])urp:)se of the debate was to reveal 
the harm of both giving and receiving liel]), and not to jirove that the one was 
more harmful than the other. 

During the drive a prize was awarded by the council to ^liss Melville 
Doughty for having written the best Honor lA-ague song. 

The election of oft'icers for 19"J1 was held February the eighteenth with 
the following officers elected : 

[77] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

President Dessie Kuhlke 

Secretary Anabel Powell 

Senior Representative Sara Evans 

Junior Representative Nonie Mullins 

Sophomore Representative Grace Etheredge 

Freshman Representative Elizabeth Oliver 

Sub-Freshman Representative Mary Kirkland 

Our League song, written to the tune of Avalon, fitly expresses the spirit 
and desire of each member of tlie Tubman Honor League. 

—Dessie Gray Kuhlke, '22. 

"Oh ! we belong to the Honor League 

Of Tubman Higli ! 
And up to the top our banners wave, 

Up to the sky ; 
To do the work that is our own, 

And do it well, 
Ls the meaning of the Black and Gold 

And the T. H. S. H. L." 

— Melville B. Doughty. 



|78| 




riABELDOWNINC 



CLEE CLUB 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Tubman Glee Club 

Louise Dye - - - President 

Dekyl Clark - — - — Vice-President 

Eleanor Lanham — Secretary and Treasurer 



Anna Branch 
Frances Brawner 
Eleanor Elliott 
Grace Etheredge 
Gene Grenekcr 
Pauline Hardin 
Martha Jarrell 
Clifford Kelly 



Elizabeth Mobley 
Dorothy Moore 
Vera McGowen 
Helen Proliyn 
Marguerite Scott 
Virginia Sevier 
Frances Sherman 
Maud Taylor 



Estelle Tant 
Katherine Theiling 
Elise Van Pelt 
Belle Walker 
Martha Wall 
Mildred Walton 
Eoretta Watson 



[80] 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class '^l 




FreshmanfGlee Club 



Louise Balk 
Dcirotliv Cameron 
Ruth fill-roll 
Kate Crawford 
Ediiionia KUiott 
Hutli Hardin 
Caroline Howell 
Marv Mercer Jackson 



Elizabeth Kreps 
Marie Leary 
Sarah Lee 
Marfraret Lockhart 
Natalie Merry 
Lueile Meyer 
Eleanor Morris 
Addie Mundav 



Elizabeth Oliver 
Alice Perkins 
norothy Fund 
Roselle Hosentlial 
Dorothy Tabb 
Sadie Tunkle 
Ruby Whaley 
Elizabeth Wilder 



[811 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tub I 




Sub-Freshman Glee Club 



Velma Bell 
Ida Bothwell 
Margaret Culpepper 
Meryl Culpepper 
(iladys Davis 
Vivian Des Combes 
Mable Downinp 
Mary Fleteher 
Philoniena Fuller 
l.uey Henry 
Caroline Hill 
Louise Holmes 



Catharine Jaek 
Clemmie Jones 
Mary Kirkland 
Martha Lester 
Mary Mathews 
Kulalia Miller 
Katharine Miioi'e 
Sadie Newhall 
Isabelle North 
Elizabeth Otis 
Marjorie Owens 
Hosina Pearl 



Erline Perkins 
Laura Heab 
Louise Seruggs 
Dorothy Smith 
Hose S])aulding 
Kli/.abeth Story 
Ida Wall 
(irayson Wells 
Marguerite Weseoat 
May Wliite 
Katharine Wiggins 



1.S2I 



Tubmciii 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '£1 




THE FIRST THANKSGIVING 



The Pageant of the Pilgrims 

— o — 

Prologue .-- - - Miss (ifiic (ironekcr 

Episode I : TIr' Landing' of Hic I'llgTims 

Episode II The First Thanksgiving 

Episode III The Maypole of Merrvniount 

Episode IV John Allien and I'riscilla 

Episode ^' King Phillip's Head 

Episode VI Tubman's Tribute to the Pilgrim Fathers 

The Spirit of Tubman _ Miss Belle Walker 



tsr, 



Class ''21 MAIDS and A MAX Tuhi 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

William Brewster Miss Elizabebtli Krcps 

Williiun Bradford -.. Miss Louise Dve 

Isaac Allerton Miss Frances Brawiier 

Miles Standisli Miss Irene Jackson 

John Alden ....Miss Kssie Tant 

Squantiun : ..Miss Mary Bostick 

Massasoit Miss Emma Plunkett 

Indian Dancers Misses Margaret McGowan and Caroline Brown 

Thomas Mortan Miss Pauline AVatson 

Nellie Standish Miss Pauline Hardin 

Friends Misses Dorma Blitchington, Ghxdys Couch, ^Margaret Wall 

Priscilla .Miss Martha Wall 

Messenger ....Miss Gene Grenekcr 

Thomas Price .Miss Deryl Clark 

Di\ Increase MatJier- Miss ]\Iary Ferguson 

Rev. Dr. Hubbard Miss Katiierine Tlieiling 

Thomas Hinckley Miss Blanche Crawford 

Capt. Thomas Willet Miss Xina Verdcry 

Capt. Josiah Winslow Miss Bessie Plunih 

King Piiillip s Head Miss Dorotiiy Levy 

Pilgrim Men, Women, Boys and (iirls ; Mayjio'e Girls, Cavaliers, Indian Braves 
and S(iuaws. 



t«'>-l 



Tub man MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 

Operetta 

I'rcsniti'il hij 

Junior Class 

MARCH 29, MO, 1921. 
— o — 

The Gypsy Rover 

PLACE—Londoii, Kngland. TIME— Present 

CAST OF CHAUACTEUS 

Meg - Rosabel Burcli 

Zara Frances Slierniaii 

Marto Melville Doughty 

Sinfo Enniia Plunkett 

Rob Eleanor Eanhani 

Ladv Constance Kathleen Allen 

Lord Craven Dorothy Bredenbcrg 

Sir Geo. Martendale ...Ruth Kitchens 

Nina Clifford Kelly 

Ca])t. Jerome Felicia Ransey 

Sir Toby Lyon Mildred Jennings 

McCorkle Irene Perkins 

Chorus : Gypsies, Englishmen, etc. 



[87] 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAX Tubman 



STORY OF THE PLAY 

■'The Gypsy Rover" is in three acts and is built around the character of 
Rob, hiter known as Sir Gilbert Howe, of the English nobility. Rob is stolen 
>vhen an infant, by his nurse, ^icg, who later becomes the wife of Marto, a 
gypsy. Rob grows to manhood amongst the gypsies believing Meg and Marto 
ro be his parents. 

It happens one dav, while riding with her fiance, Lord Craven, Lady 
Constance Martendale becomes lost in the woods. Tiiev wander to the gvpsy 
camp where Constance and Rob meet and fall in love at first sight. Craven 
objects to Rob's attitude, but in a very funny comedy scene with Marto and 
Sinfo, he is made to tell Sir George, wiio later comes in search of Constance and 
.-■erenades her. They jilan to elope but are overheard by Craven wiio informs 
Sir George, and plans are made to capture Rob. This is successfully accom- 
piislicd and Rob is thrown into ])rison, but later escapes. 

Two years elapse and Rob has come into his estates, his identity having 
been proved by Meg. He becomes a successful composer, a friend of the 
Prince, and a social lion. Constance has remained true to her love for Rob 
and on his return to England, he woos and wins her for his wife. As Rob 
says, "The good fairies have led me to the beautiful country after all, and our 
story, Constance, can end in tlie ]iro]ier way, 'They lived hajipilv ever after'." 

There are also pretty love affairs between Nina and Capt. Jerome and Zara 
and Sinfo. and many comedy scenes by Sinfo and INIarto. Space jirevents 
giving more than a thread of the plot. 



|HH| 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class 'i2I 



The Prize Essay 



Q 



ROF. SHELDON', head of the Department of English in the State Tni- 
versity, was addressing the Parent-'I'eachers' Association of Sparta, the 
little college town. His closinp' remarks were: 



''And in tlie interest of developing the budding authors of our grammar 
grades, let nie suggest that tlie com))ositions they are told to write pertain to 
the world as they know it. Don't liave tlieni write on life in the Colonies or 
King Arthur's Court. Develoj) tlieir originality and self-expression. Give 
them themes on home and playground, Saturday, play day. I am authorized 
by the English Department to ofter a ])ri/e for the best essay from the fourth 
grade on some such subject as 'How I Spent the Week-End,' or 'What I Did 
Friday Night,' and I would suggest tliat tlie ])rize composition be j)ublished in 
the Sparta Banner.'' The Association adjourned, but the members, chatting 
in groups, watched witli interest an incident on the other side of the room. 

"'He seems very attractive.'* 

"'How long do vou suppose it will be before she gives liim an answer.''" 

■'You mean, make up lier mind! He iind John Smith ai-e running a close 
race from all ap])earances." 

Nor were the association members alone in tlieir interest. The wliole town 
was gossipping about tlie brilliant and liandsome young ])rofessor and his at- 
tention to the pretty little widow, Mrs. Andrews. Tlie ])ublic eye noticed tliat 
he joined her and togetlier tliey walked out of the building. As they strolled 
toward her home, Emily Andrews ran to meet them. "Mother, mother, can I 
go over to Mary's house and play in her new doll house .^" 

"Yes, yes, run along," answered her mother witii a relieved smile. Emily 
was very fond of the professor and it was sometimes hard to send her away. 

Acting on tiie professor s suggestion, tlie fourth grade teachers promptly 
assigned their children, among whom were Mary and Emily, a com])osition on 
"How I Sjjent Friday,"' to be handed in the following Monday. ]\Iany little 
hands and heads were busy Saturday, and many a family secret was frankly 
disclosed to the eyes of the interested teachers. 

The next Wednesday morning, Mrs. Andrews was more than surprised at 
reading in the paper : 

"Acting promptly upon the offer of the English Department of the Univer- 
sity, the fourth grade pupils have submitted a number of essays. The judges 
have decided that the following is the best and the prize was awarded the 
,Voung author, Mary Spear, clever daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Earnest Spear 
of this city. 

[891 



Class "HI MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

" 'HOW I SPENT FRIDAY. 

" 'I will begin with when I got out of school Friday because I didn't spend 
Friday morning, school sjjcnt it for me. First, Emily asked mother could I 
spend the night with her, and she said, 'Yes.' We cleaned up the doll house 
and I put on a clean dress and went home with Emily. We read her new story 
book until it was time to help set the table for supjier. Soon as supper was 
over, Prof. Sheldon rang the door bell. He didn't seem so glad to see us, but 
he gave us a bag of peppermints. Then Mrs. Andrews told us to run and 
clear off the table, and then play in the dining room. So we did and we 
peeped through the crack in the door and watched them. Emily giggled and 
her mother heard her, and told us to 'run upstairs and play and simt the 
door. So we went upstairs and painted our cheeks like real grown ladies and 
put on some lovely long dresses. Emily was Mrs. de Graffennied and gave a 
party, and I was Mrs. de Bardeleben and came to the party. We had just 
lots fun excepting that Emily spilled some punch on her mother's pink silk 
dress. We started down stairs to see if they'd know us and Emily said 'Oh!' 
She pointed to the transom. I looked and saw them through the transom. 
And we stayed awful still and watched. He was talking so low we couldn't 
hear it. He took her hand and held it a minute and she jumped up and started 
to put some coal on the fire and he started to do it for her. And then he took 
her and kissed her ! Emily looked at me and I looked at her and then we 
looked through the transom again. Mrs. Andrews was crying and shaking 
her head and he looked worried and didn t know what to do. Then he got his 
hat and asked her something. She smiled and nodded her head and thev went 
to the door. When he said goodby he kissed her hand and she said 'Wed- 
nesday night.' 

" 'Tlien Emily and I ran upstairs and went to bed and declared we wouldn't 
never tell. 

•' 'That is how I spent 'Friday.' " 

Mrs. Andrews dropped the paper. "The little wretches !" she exclaimed as 
she ran to the telephone, "the wliole town's read of it now !" 

"Have you read the morning paper.'' ' she asked when the professor hail 
answered the 'phone. "Well, I just want to tell you, you can announce our 
engagement to your interested and in(iuiring friends ! And the sooner, the 
better!" She left tlie receiver dangling and fled to her room. 

That afternoon, an amazed and delighted Mary Spear received a five-ijound 
box of Huyler's hearing this card: 

"Dear Mar_v : Plase accept this in addition to the prize for your excl- 
(ent composition. Most gratefully yours, Olin N. Sheldon." 

—Martha Jarrell. '21. 



ron] 



EonA Agee 




ATHLETICS 



Class 'iei 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubi 




Athletic Council 

Bmma Pluxkett .Assistant Plii/s'uiil Director 

Dorothy PrxD Scrrctarij 

Mildred Gardner Vicc-Presidcitt 

Effie Pltxkett T red surer 

Katherixe Jack ...Sub-Frcshnuin licprcscntdtivc 

Miss Ray Lormax , ^^.J'hi/xicdl Director 

Irexe Jacksox J'residcnt of Coinicil 

Miss Lot'ise Wilsox Faculti) Uepresentdtive 



I!).:; 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '•£! 



The Athletic Association 



^^=^HE Athletic Association, as its name ini])lic's, is formed for the purpose 
^^^ of adoptini^ rules under which contests between clubs or teams tliat com- 
pose its membership arc to be conducted. In tliis way games can be 
played under rules wiiich will be known in advance to tlie clubs or teams com- 
posing its nienibersiii]). The election of tiie officers of the Athletic Associa- 
tion shall take place in danuary of each year. Th(/ president shall be chosen 
fiom the Senior Class; the vice-president from the Junior Class; the treasurer 
from the Sophomore Class, and the sccretai-y from tiie Freshman Class. One 
girl from the Sub-Freshman Class shall be eiiosen as rei)rescntative of that class. 

The Association has proven iiself \erv helpful in bringing about clean 
s])oi-t in these physical contests, for it ''an make ruli's whit'h \\\\\ bar nu-mbers 
of the various team, or teams, from competition in contests if the members, or 
the teams. ])crsist in ])racticing or using im|)roper methods of play. 

Tl;e Athletic Coiuicil shall consist of all the ott'icers of the Athletic ,\sscia- 
tion, a member of the faculty, th.e physical dii-ector with her assistant, ami the 
principal. The Council shall present all letters and nmnerals to these girls 
winning same and may withliold anv lettiT or numeral whit'h it deems the 
wiiuiei' unworthy of wearing. 

V — Irene Jackson. 



RESILTS OF S\VIMMI.\(i MEET 

First Place -• Irene Jackson 

Seconil Place Anna Murray 

Third Place Dorothy Levy 

Fourth Place Anna Eve 

Fifth Place Virginia Sevier 



[931 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Varsity Team 



Cecelia Baker. Capfdiii 
Martha Wall Vera McGowen 

-Minnie Cohen Mary Bostick 

Marifaret MoGowan Mailie Mimmms 



Annie E. Clever 
Belle Walker 
Irene .laek^on 



'0\' 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 



Thomson vs. Tubman 



Of course we had a good time at Tlioinson and beat their team 22 to .5! 
But let me begin at the very beginning. 

On tlie train going up. we were "kinder" scared and also very hungry. 
Nellie had some salted peanuts which she passed around, but our honorable, 
charming and thoughtful coach forbade our eating them. You know, how- 
ever, how peanuts naturally do — they just ooze out of the sack by ones and 
twos and hungry girls cannot (unless against their consciences) inclose them 
again in their air-tight bag. 

A "sub' asked one of our forwards, the red-haired one, if the peanuts were 
Hiood and this truthful Tubman g-irl answered, "Tiiose I had, were — want 
some.'"' But the little sub (also red-haired) refused; j)oor ciiild ! Little did 
she know what she missed. 

After passing through Grovetown, Boneville, and a few other jjrogressive 
burgs, we finally arrived at Thomson. We gave a locomotive Rah-Rah-Rah- 
Thomson, and then were carried to tiie High School in cars. 

The game was called for five o'clock and then the fun and suspense began. 
At first many shots at the goal failed, but. happily for us, our noble Forwards 
began to score and the first third ended with fi to 2 in our favor. 

Tubman was forced to ])ut u}) a good fight. Her side center was changed 
for each third. Sadly we saw some of Irene's well-directed balls fall into the 
hands of nimble Lillian, the "Cat," of the Thomson team. 

The Tubman "rooters" offered good advice and cheered our team to victory. 
When victory was ours and the Tubmanites had "Rah-rah-ed" to the limit of 
their ability, they hoisted Mary, "the bob-haired' forward, to their slioulders 
and gave her share of glory. 

After the game was over, we went to Loui.se's to "freshen uj)" and primp 
(you may be sure enough of the latter was done). It was then that we realized 
two calamities had occurred. First, our Jumj^ing Center had forgotten her 
— well, anyhow, her — something, she had recently bought — Oh ! yes, it's jersey 
and changeable in color. Second, the red-haired forward had left her georg- 
ette skirt waist at the school and the doors were locked. 

Well, to relieve the suspense, or in other words, to let you down easy, our 
Jumping Center finally got her — lost article; the Forward wore a middy in- 

1931 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

stead of her forgotten waist: and all of us powdered our noses once more and 
went down stairs to tea. 

As the newspapers say, "A delightful tea was enjoyed immensely by all." 
Later, while some danced, others played Rook. 

Before leaving Thomson, a certain P'orward and a Side Center saw that 
their ])ockets were well-filled with the forbidden peanuts. As the train pulled 
out, we Tubmanites yelled back our final thanks and good-byes and sank into 
our seats to think of the "GRAND" time we'd just had and to enjoy some of 
Mr. Garrett's choice chocolate candy and to reflect on the praise that we felt 
ivas our due. 

— Annie Evelvn Mever, '21. 



[96] 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




Senior Basket Ball Team 

Captain, Anna Evo, J. C. 

^larv Ferguson, G. [Margaret McGowan, F. Martlia Jarrel!. G. 

I.sabell Kendrick. F. Belle Walker, S. C. Eulah A'auglian, Sub. 



[97] 



Class '^1 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Freshman Basket Ball Team 

K. Dowliii^ Forward 

K. Krcps Guard 

L. Balk Guard 

V. Mobley Forward 

A. Peebles Side Center 

K. Sel[iHihK-lier Juni[)iiig C'eiitt r 



[98] 



7^ lib I 



MAIDS and A :MAN 



Class '21 




Aiinio B. Daniel 
Marguerite Scott 
Elise Van Pelt 



Junior Hockey Team 

Alberta Casj)ar_v 
Vera ]McGowcn 
Elizabeth Moblev 



Anna E. Branch 
Edna Agee 



[99] 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Clans '21 




Sophomore Hockey Team 



]\Iiircc'lla Holiiiaii 
Ett'if I'lunkctt 
Eliiora Uuiinctt 



Captain, Helen Proliyn 

.Marv Hoatli 
Janio Toniniins 
Minnie Cohen 
Maia-aret Dunn 



Florence lA'ster 
Cecelia Baker 
Alarv Matlienv 



[101] 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 







^31 




r -^ •' 


2^Jll'%<JE • - « »' 




m 








^^' 









Sophomore Base Ball Team 



Margaret Dunn 
Plorence Lester 
Cecelia Baker 



Elizabeth Bennett 
Janie Toniins 
EH'ie riunkett 



Marv Heath 
Frances Sandler 
Grace Strauss 



I 1021 



1' lib III (I II 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 




]M;iud Taylor 
Elizabeth Oliver 
Caroline Brown 



Tennis 



Elizabctli :\I()bloy 
Anna Eve 
ilargaret Dunn 
Annie B. Daniel 



Sarah Iat 
Dorothy Pund 
Eilna Affec 



[lo:5j 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Sub-Freshmen Captain Ball 



ICrline Perkins 
Caroline Hill 
Dorothy Hell 
Vivian Des Combes 
Elizabeth Storey 
Marv Matthews 



Velnia Bell 
Rebecca Andrews 
Rebecca Smith 
Mary Sikes 
Dorothy Smith 
Rose Spaulding 
Mav HoUev 



Mildred Owens 
Lucy G. Henry 
lAiary Woochdl 
Ida Wall 

Catharine Branch 
Sarah Xorris 



1 1041 



Tuhuuni 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 





^.^ - 








T^^nr "^'H^H 



l-Ul->ii.MK.N e Al,l>l'ilhMC:^ 




fldol 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Why He Slumped 



QEXX was on his way to meet Stej)lianie to take lier to lunch. As he liad 
known her only three weeks, he did not know much about her except 
that she was the dearest girl in the world. It was the first time she had 
allowed him to take her anywhere. >o he determined to select the most ex])en- 
sive ])lace he could find, although it was nearing the end of tiie month and his 
funds were nearly out. In fact, he had only twehe dollars. 

There she was now, waiting for him. He quickened his ste])s. After they 
liad spoken, Penn hailed a taxi. 

''Penn, ' said Stephanie reproyingly. "yon siiouldn't have done that. We 
can walk to the Blue Rcse,*' naming a small restaurant. 

■'Blue Rose I Do you think I'm going to take you there when this is the 
very first time you have — " 

"Then let's go to the Wayside." 

"No. I'm going to take vou to the best ])lace in town." 

"All right, we'll go to the Garfield." 

When they arrived. Penn handed a bill to the chauffeur, waving the change 
in a magnanimous manner. 

After the waiter had taken their order, Ste])hanie smiled at Penn be- 
witchingly. 

"Why did vou want to bring me here.'"" she teased. 

Penn blushed. He could do it so well, altlunigh he hated it worse than 
poison. 

"Oh — er — don"t bother me."" he returneil banteringlv. \Vhereupon she 
began to eat, as the waiter had brought their order. 

Penn was raising his fork to his mouth when suddenly his face froze in 
horror. He had given that chauffeur a ten dollar bill instead of a one! 

"What on earth is the matter.^" 

Penn swallowed hard. The office was right around the corner. Maybe 
he could borrow five dollars from one of the boys if he could only think of an 
excuse to get away I 

"I just thought of a \ery foolish tiling I did."" he said. "I left some 
rather im])ortant ])aj)ers on my ilesk and the window was open. I'm afraid 
the wind will blow them off. Would you excuse me a few minutes.'"' 

"Oh, I'm so sorry. Certainly I'll excuse you."' 

Penn pushed his chair back and fairly flew out of the ]ilair to the cdfice. 
At the door he stopped short. It was Satiinlay afterimon and r\erv(ine had 
a half-holiday! But maybe s(Hneoiie had Ntayed late to finish up some uork. 
His hope revived. He opened the door franticallv bv means of his own ke\. 
and there came to iiis eyes what he thought wa-. the sweetest sight he had e\er 
seen — okl Tom Withers with a fi\r dollai- bill in hi^ hand. I'eiui rusju-d up to 

[l(m| 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '21 

him. snatclK'd tlie bill from the hand of the bewildered man and rushed out 
again, crying over his shoulder, "Will explain later!" 

He opened the restaurant door with something like relief and entered. 
Heavens! To his horrified gaze came the sight of Tillie Uowen, who had the 
reputation ofbeing the biggest eater in town, seated by Stephanie. By some 
means or other, he finally reached the table and sank into his chair. 

"'Hello, Penn. I saw Stephanie sitting here and, as she looked lonesome, 
I joined her. I didn't think you'd mind," she said, quite oblivious of his mur- 
derous ga/e. 

"Er — yes," said Penn. 

''Did vou find the j)apers all right.''' asked Stejihanie kindlv. 

''Er — yes," said Penn again. 

As Tillie gave her order, he managed to scribble something on a ))iecc of 
])aper and hand it to the waiter, unnoticed by the two girls. 

In a few minutes a tele])hone boy came in calling: "Wildruin ! Wildrum ! 
Mr. Penn Wildrum !" 

Penn seemed not to notice until Stejihanie said: "Isn't tiiat vou.'" 

"Here, boy !" 

"I.,ong distance call for you, sir." 

"I'm sorry, but it seems you'll ha\e to excuse me again, ' said Penn in a 
most pathetic manner. And for a second time he hurled himself out of the 
restaurant and into a taxi. 

"Here, take me to the nearest pawn-shop as fast as you can !" he cried to 
the chauffeur. 

"Yes, sir," answered the chauffeur, comiilying. He seemed to be used to 
such requests. 

"How much for this watch?" 

The ])awnbroker took it slowly from the man's hands and looked it over 
carefully and suspiciously. 
"Sixty dollars." 

"For goodness sake, give it to me !" and Penn was off again. 
He sat down breathlessly in his chair. 
"Bad news.'' asked Stephanie, nuich concerned. 
"Er — yes — er — no — I don't supj)ose so," he answered. 
After what seemed like ages to Penn, Tillie rose and left. 
He beckoned a waiter. 
"Check, please." 
"No check, sir. It is arranged." 

"You see, Penn, since you insisted on taking me to a high-])riced place I 
chose this one, and then Tillie coming in — you know father owns this jiotel — 
iihy, Penn, what arc you slumping down like that for.''" 

— Aleen Fowke, '21. 

[1071 



Class '^1 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubr, 




Et Cetera 

Leah White Assistant Commercinl Instructor 

Emma Pi-unkett ....Assistant Aflilctic Instructor 

Elizabeth Gardner Post-Grddimtc 

Mildred Vox Kami' Pout -d rod mitc 

Pearl Cohen Post-Crniihiiitc 

Dorothy Lew Post (irailmitr 



|l(lSi 




cur)^H~R£i6n 



Class '21 MAIDS and A MAN Tub) 



A Faculty Meeting 



Time— 2:10 P. M. Place— hunch Room 

Mr. Garrett: "I have a matter of great importance that I wisli to bring 
before you. After considering how hot it is and liow many good movies are 
coming here this spring, I wish to state that — I'll have a roll, j)lease, Miss 
Parks.'" 

Miss Lormax: "Mr. Garrett, will you make Margaret Jones buy a new 
mirror for the locker room.'' She was standing before the mirror j)owedring 
her nose and the mirror broke!" 

Mr. Garrett: "Er — I'll have another roll, please, I'm not very hungry 
today — no, I won't take any soup." 

Miss P.\RKs: "By the way, Mr. Garrett, Martha Jarrell has been caught 
cheating and I'd like a suggestion as to her punishment."' 

Miss McCaxts : "Expel her. The Brat !'' 

Miss Dora: "I always suspected that Martha had a Latin jack." 

Miss Flisch : "Well, bless Milandy !" 

Mr. Garrett: "Now that matter required a great deal of thought, but 
as I was saying " 

Miss Comey : "Catherine Thciling lias taken a fancy to skipping my 
periods. Dear me, what shall I do.!"' 

Miss Hamilton' : "I suggest that you susjjend her imme:liately." 

Miss West: "Have yo'all been to tiie Bee Hive lately.^ Thev ii:ive a 
su])])ly of [)retty things and. Miss Holley, there's a cute little blond clerk work- 
ing in the store." 

Miss Fi.isru : "The promiscuous use of profanity around this school i^ 
having a demoralizing influence ii])on the Subs. Mr. Garrett, let me suggest 
that vou speak to Marv Ferguson about the wav slie lias been cussing ai'ovuid 
liere lately. Sucli a thing as tliis iH'\'er lia|i|K'iis in Wisconsin." 

Miss Eve: "(.Miarlotte Chase's dresses are disgracefully short, so I sug- 
gest that we make a rule regulating the length of skirts." 

Mr. (taruett: "But as I was saying " 

Mrs. Parks: "Miss Page, will you take your milk now.-"' 

[lioj 



Tubman MAIDS and A ^rA N Class '21 

Miss Woods: "JNIiss Dora, who do you tliiiik will get first honor?" 

Miss Doha: "It will be a closu race between Polly and Nina. I really 
don t know which one has flunked the most." 

iMiss ]\Iaiu;ie: "I certainly wish the Hoard of Education would give us a 
new piano. This one sounds awfully tin paiuiy." 

]\Iiss Wii.sox: "Now don't blame the ])iano ; it's doing its best!" 

]\li{. Garrett: "One of the little chocolate cakes and a roll, please — as I 
was saying, tho " 

Miss I'.\c;e: "I wonder, Mr. Garrett, if you know the name of the French 
professor at the University of Chicago.'' Irene has written a beautiful French 
])oein and I can't exactly translate it." 

Miss F'l.iscH : "I found a theme in the study hall today, but I can't read 
the name. It really resembles ancient hieroglyphics.' 

]\Iiss \\'()c;i>s: "Ahem! That's Anna Kve's writing. No wonder vou 
couldn't decipher it." 

Miss AVest : "I went to see Charlie Chai)lin last night and lie is perfectly 
adorable." 

]Mr. Gaurett: "After much thinking (ui a matti'r of great iiiii);)rtance, 
I've decided that we'll reduce the length of school day from (i hours to 2 hours 
and have 2 hours recess! ! !" 

— I. Jackson. 



imi 



Class '"21 MAIDS and A MAX Tubman 



Famous Quotations 

As They Might Have Been Said 
— o — 

Hours in clu.sses all rciiiincl us 

Wc can make our lives sublime, 

And by asking foolish (juestions 

Take u|) all our teaclier's time! 



-Ex. 



* 



Of all sad words that ears can hear 
The saddest are these — Exams are near! 

—Ida Bothwell. '2 3. 

^; ^ ^ ^! =jS: 

Huniptv-dum])t V sat on an education, 
Humpt y-dumjjfy had an examination ; 
But all the Faculty and Mr. Garrett, too. 
Couldn't i)ull Humpty-dumpty through. 

— Eugenia Milleton, ''l~y. 

« » * * Si 

First in Latin, First in Math, First in tlie hearts of the Faculty. 

It matter.3 not how a girl studies, but how she recites. 

The Road to Flunk is paved with good intentions. 

A thought in the head is worth two in the book. 

Many are called on, but few get "A-|-." 

Seniors have their Virgil, Juniors have their Cicero, 

Sophomores have their Caesar — may the Freshmen profit by their 

examjile! — Martha Jarrell, "21. 

(From the A'arsity) T-ittle Zeroes flunk our Heroes. 



[liii 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



Neighbor: They tell me your son 
is on the football team at college — 
what position does he play? 

Proud Mother : I'm not sure, but 
I think I heard Pa say he was one 
of the drawbacks. 

* * * 

Miss Ward : Name some uses of the 
potato. 

Sub-Freshman : To stop up kero- 

sine cans ! 

* * * 

Sh! Sh! 

Little Boy ; Papa, a kiss can't be 
nothing but a kiss, can it.' 

Father: No, my son. 

Little Boy : Well, I heard sister's 
beau say it was 'heaven the other 

night ! 

* * * 

Miss Woods : Give me the princ- 
ipal parts of the verb "will." 

Pupil (absent-mindedly) : Will, 
Willie, WiUiam. 

Sister (gazing at a photo of her 
fiance) : His noble profile makes me 
think of the Great Stone Face. 

Young Brother (in disgust): 
Humph! makes me think of the 
great bone head. 

* * * 

Miss Flisch : What comes after the 
17th amendment.'' 

Mary: The 18th, I guess. 

» * * 

Found in an essay on Grant at 
Appomattox : Lee was handsomely 
attired in full uniform with his 



sword by his side, while Grant had 
on nothing but an old ragged Union 

Suit! 

* * * 

Editor : Francis, do you care if I 
put an old joke in the annual on you, 
tiiat you said "Wlio wrote Frank- 
lin's Autobiograjjhy'".'' 

Francis : No. But who did write 
'it? 

Heard in the Hall 

Irene: What does P.H.D. stand 
for, Pliysical Director.' 

In discussing the Pageant : Why 
didn't they sing the second verse of 
the Doxology.' 

Literary Editor: Miss Woods has 
been reading us a story about Teu- 
tonic Friendship. 

Sophomore : Say, what kind of 
nuts do the}' ])ut in chocolate covered 
almonds .'' 

One of Miss H.'s Crushes: My! 
Hasn't Miss Hollingswortli kept her 
youthful looks ! 

* * * 

Louise : I've got a splinter in my 
finger nail. 

Belle: Must liave been scratciiing 
your liead ! 

* * * 

Phys. Dir. (in class inspection): 
Have you got on your own dotlies.' 

Belle : No'm ; I've got on Gym's 
shoes. 



flU] 



Tubiium 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class '21 



Mrs. Chase: So you have met my 
daughter, Charlotte.' 

Irene: Yes'm ; we slept together 
in the same French class ! 



Willie : What answer did you get 
for the dani-fonstructioii prohlem.'' 

Martha : I didn't do the ilam 
})robleni I 



Chemistry Teacher: The gas has 
passed off and there is only salt dis- 
solved in the water now. 

Frances : Where did the sodium 

chloride go.' 

^ ^ 

General Braddock was a brave 
man. He had three horses shot from 
under him and a forth went through 



is clothes 



Did you hear the noise in the hall.'' 
No. Wliat ]iaj)pened.'' 

Miss Wimi blew in I 

* * * 

What do you think of a Tubniiui 
girl that is .-,3 modest siie won't do 
im]>ro])er fractions.'' 

Wok! 

AVillie Rose Sat on a pin — Willie 
Rose I 

* * * 

A A'cK' Game 

]Mary: I won the booby jjrize at 
the party. 

Little Sister: How do you play 

booby .'' 

* * * 

Miss Goolsby : Name the leading 
political party in the South. 

Freshman: The League of Nations. 

Nell : I danced with that bald- 
headed man. 

Margaret: Which one.' The one 

without anv hair.-" 



^liss Hamilton (rushing in the 
i-oom to make out daily report) : All 
the absent girls please raise their 
hands. 

* * « 

Mr. Garrett : Tiiere's a man here 
interested in the feeble-minded — 
where is Miss Mains.' 

* » * 

Teacher: Tell me about tile Xylo- 
jjlione.' 

Pupil : He was a Greek piiilosopher. 

* * * 

^Ir. Garrett (sympathetically, to 
a Sub-Freshman coming from exami- 
nation room) : How did you come out 
this morning.' 

Sub: AVho. me? I came out on the 
street car I 

* * * 

Miss Goolsby (in the lunch room) : 
Miss Parks, why is the milk so thin.' 

]Mrs. Parks: I don't know; you'll 
have to ask the cows. 

Mr. Garrett : They probably need 
a little more Green. 



[115] 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



Placing the Blame 
Miss Smith : Wliv are you late to 
class? 

Sarah Evans : Class began before 

I got here. 

* * ^ 

Miss Margie: Marguerite, do you 
know "I've Been Working on the 
Railroad"? 

^larguerito: No'm; I didn't know 

it. 

* * * 

Mary : My dog's name is Ginger. 
Sally: Does Ginger bite? 

Mary : No ; Ginger snaps ! 

* * * 

What possessions did Charles I. 
get? 

By marriage he got Hungary. 

* * * 

Deryl: I don't like those pictures 
at all. I look like an ape. 

Photographer : You should have 
thought of that before you had tliem 

taken ! 

* * * 

A Dictionary 

Appendicitis : A modern ])ain, 
costing about $200 more than the old 
fashioned stomach-ache. 

Bone: One Dollar — the original 
price of a wife — note Adam, who had 
to give up a bone before he got Eve. 

Borrow: To swap hot air for cold 
coin. 

Cemetery : The one place wiiere 
princes and paupers, porters and 
presidents are finally on the dead 
level. 

Champagne: The stuff tliat makes 
the world go 'round. 



Cinder: One of Jie first things to 
catch your eye in traveling. 

Cauliflower: A cabbage with a 
college education. 

Dust : ]\Iud witli the juice s(juee/ed 
out. 

Echo: The only thing tliat can 
cheat a woman out of tiie last word. 

Engagement : In war, a battle : in 
love, the salubrious calm that pre- 
cedes the real hostilities. 

Ether: One of the world's three 
great composers — the others being 
Gas and Chloroform, whose airs are 
])ojnilar among the sufferers. 

Football : A clever subterfuge for 
carrying on prize fights under the 
guise of a r.^putable game. 

Kiss: Njthing divided by two. 

Lark: A short sweet spree enjoyed 
by night hawks — also an early-rising 
singing bird (distinguish between 
"Out on a Lark" and "Up with a 
Lark," an impossible combination). 

Nose: A prominent member of the 
face family, usually a Greek or a 
Roman, who owns the shortest bridge 
in the world. He is often stuck up 
in Comjiany, but frequently blows 
himself when he has his grippe. 

Shimmy : Originated in recent war. 
Derived from Latin excutio — verb, 
to shake out — ex (preposition mean- 
ing out of). 

Cooty : A term well known to every 
soldier. 

Pro and Con : Prefixes of opposite 
meaning — example : Progress and 
Congress. 

Troy: An ancient, oriental city, 
wiiich took in a wooden horse and 
saw the domestic finish of Helen and 
Paris. Do not confuse witli Troy, 
N. Y., where they only take in wasli- 
ing and ))rovide a domestic finish for 
collars and shirts. 



[116] 



ruhmun MAIDS uml A MAX Class '2i 



Calendar 



Sept. 13 — Scliool opens, much to our regret. 

Oct. 25 — Frederick Ward comes. AVe get out of two les.son.s ! 

Oct. 26 — Class elections and removal of feet from r)rchestra railing. 

Nov. 1 — Scliool parade. Miss Lenora Sparkes. 

Nov. 18 — De])arture of Carolyn from Tubman. 

Nov. 22 — Visit to telephone office. 

Ndv. 26 and 27 — Thanksgiving holidays. 

Dec. 23 — Lecture by John Temple Graves. 

Dec. 16 and 17 — Presentation of the landing of Pilgrims given by school. 

Dec. 17 — Mr. Hickmans' concert and Christmas holidays begin. 

Jan. 3 — School re-opens — woe is us. 

Jan. .5 — Faculty Meeting (Frances Tennent walks to school). 

Jan. 7 — Dedication of annual. 

Jan. 15 — Ennnma races with driverless Ford do\vn hill. She wins. 

Jan. 19 — Lee's Birthday. Speeches by the six modest members of the 
Senior Class. 

Jan. 24 — Mr. Garrett speaks on matter of importance. 

Jan. 26 — Noise in the hall. Miss Winn blew in. 

Feb. 26 — Exams begin! AVeeping and wailitig and gnashing of teeth. 

Feb. 9— See Jan. 2-1. 

Feb. 17 — Lieurance Orchestra Concert. 

Feb. 21 — Tubman extra — Helen Gibbs enters into connubial bliss. 

Feb. 22 — Washington's Birthday. 

Feb. 23 — Miss Hains ill — new teacher arrives. 

Mar. 3— Talk by Director of Pratt Listitute. 

Mar. -1 — Mr. Jarrell gives talk on ])rinci))les of Honor League. 
Thomson vs. Tubman — Tubman victor — score 22-5. 

Mar. 5— See Feb. 9. 

Mar. 29-30 — Junior Play, The Gypsy Rover. 

June 5-9 — Final Exams — "Hope springs eternal in the human breast." 

June 11 — Baccalaureate. 

June 1.5 — Junior Banquet. 

June 16 — Connnencement. 

lllTl 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



To Our Advertisers 



>T^E, the Editorial Staff of "Maids and A Man," 
^^ desire to express to our advertisers our 
sincere appreciation of tlieir assistance in insur- 
ing tlie success of tliis publication. 



Class '"21 MAIDS and A MAN Tubi 



Augusta- Aiken Railway & Electric 
Corporation 

POWER LIGHT HEAT 

STREET CAR SERVICE 



Good Wishes for the Tubman Qirls Expressed 
in Efficient Service 



+— " — — ■— 



Palmer-Spivey Construction 
Company 

Builders of the U^ew 'tubman 
Augusta — ::— Georgia 



+. . . . . — . . V 

|1L'()| 



Tubman MAIDS and A .MAX Class '21 



ISI Georgia 6 Florida IS 

Railway 

Before buying a farm, locating an industry or making an 
investment, investigate the possibilities along the GEORGIA 
& FLORIDA RAILWAY. 

The standing saw mill timber, the fertile and productive 
farm lands at relatively low prices and the possible water 
power development is worth investigating. 

Call on or write 
D. F. KIRKLAND, W. E. FRENCH, 

General Manager, Immigration Agent, 

Augusta, Ga. Valdosta, Ga. 1 



RAILWAY 3 ^ ^ r^ '^ 

= ' Augusta, Ga. 



=-= W.D.COOK, 

130-JP General Freight and Passenger Agent 113 o-i^ 



RAILWAY 



Why 



TUBMAN GIRLS J/f/L ' / 



Should Patronize-— W hllC S 



— The manafrer of our Ready-to-\Vear and Millinery Departments, Mrs. Lombard 
Brinson (Wilheniina N'urnlierfrer) is a Tul)man Girl. She will huy her stock with the 
every-day and Graduation needs of Tuhnian Girls in mind. 

— The manager of our Mail Order Department, Kva Danforth, is a Tuliman Ciirl, who 
i.s especially interested in Tubman Girls who go away to scliool. 

— The one who writes you this little advertisement, .lulia Johnston, is a Tubman tlirl, 
too, trying to live up to her class motto, "Haud ye I.eal" — Hold yourselves Loyal — in 
telling the news of tliis store to Tubman Girls, and the pulilie in general. 

— With these, and many other Tultman Girls, as a part of this store's organization, OF 
COURSK. White's takes a genuine interest in you, Tubman Girls. 

WE SOLICIT YOLK P.VTRONWCiE 

/. B. WHITE & CO. 

AUGUSTA GEORQIA 



[1211 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 



BUILD WITH BRICK 

For an exterior of enduring cliarm — charm that plainly proclaims 
HOAIE, no other material can be compared to brick or tile. 

More year around comfort, greater economy, more sanitary, sub- 
stantial savings in repair and insurance costs, no depreciation in value. 

Nine immense brick plants in Georgia and the Carolinas ready to fill 
carload or train load orders promptly and at attractive prices. 

Certified Common Brick, Certified Face Brick, and Denison Load 
Bearing Tile. 

Write for information and prices. 

GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK COMPANY 



AUGUSTA 

HOWARD H. STAFFORD, President 



GEORGIA 

HOWARD R. WALKER, Sales Manager 






A. H. MERRY 



PIERCE MERRY 



MERRY & COMPANY 

Wholesale Fruits and Produce 

Our Specialty 

APPLES :• ORANGES :: BANANAS 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 



A. C. L. TRACKS 



Cor. NINTH and REYNOLDS 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '21 



THIS BANK 



is not restricted in the sc()])e of its patronage. It is broad enougli to 
accommodate all. and HERE ARE ITS PATRONS— 

1 . Tile young folks with their .'}. The well-to-do, for the con- 

small savings. venience afforded and the in- 

„ „, , , . . . come provided. 

2,. 1 lie bread-winner, striving to ^ 

accumulate a fund to procure 4. Those with idle funds awaiting 

a home, or a coiiipetencv for other investment. 

old age. 

FOUR PER CENT COMPOUND INTEREST PAID 

Deposits Mai/ Br Made hij Mail 

THE AUGUSTA SAVINGS BANK 

827 BROAD STREET AUGUSTA, GA. 

Forty-one Years of Faithful Service 



THE NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK 
OF AUGUSTA 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

Onljj Xational Bank in Anyusta 
Capital and Surplus ----- $700,000.00 

OFFICERS 

P. E. MAY, President 
E. A. PENDLETON, Vice-President 
PAUL MUSTIN, Vice-President 
W. T. WIGGINS, Cashier 

FOUR PER CENT ON SAVINGS 



Class '21 .AIAIDS and A MAX Tub) 






J. RICE SMITH, President 1,. C. HAYXE, Vice-President 

E. F. JACKSON, Vice-Pres. & Sect\ . W. C. WIXGARD, Treasurer. 

Established 1876 

GEORGIA CHEMICAL WORKS 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS and ACID 
PHOSPHATES 

Subsidiary of the \'irginia-Carolina Chemical Co. 

Augusta, Georgia 



BARRETT & CO., Inc. 

Augusta, Georgia 

THE LARGEST COTTON FACTORS 
IN THE WORLD 






.._, — .. ._.._„_„ + 

112+1 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class "21 



Stelling-Nickerson Shoe Co. 

810 BROAD STREET 

lictdilcrs of 

FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

"Your I iispcctioii Invited" 



^ 



*.— .. 



TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

T. H. GARRET, riiiuipal 

Tlic Girls" High School of the Pubhc Scliool System of Augusta and i 
Richnioiul County. Georgia. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Mr. James L. Fleming, PrasUlcni Dr. T. E. Oertel, Vice-President 

Mr. Lawton B. Evans, Secretary and Snpt. of Schools 

HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

i\Ir. T. I. Hickman, Chairman 

Mr. C. E. Whitney Mr. W. R. Johnston Mr. W. S. Morris 

Mr. H. L. Murphey Mr. C. T. Fund 

Mr. F. W. Hulse, Sr. 

. . . — . . . + 

[126] 



Class '"21 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 




SNOWDRIFT 

rich creamy cooJ^ing fat 

The fact that Snowdrift is 
pure vegetable oil and no- 
thing else, means that it 
has the highest possible 
food value. Snowdrift not 
only makes things good to 
eat, but is itself a more 
nourishing food than al- 
most anything else you eat. 



SOUTHERN COTTON OIL TRADING COMPANY 

2Vpk' York Savannah yexc Orlean/t 



CJiira</o I 






YOUNG LADIES, 

CONTINUE YOUR EDUCATION BY READING 

®l)p Auguata (Elironirlp 

The South's Oldest Newspaper 

I KEEP ABREAST OF THE TIMES BY CONSTANT 
I READING OF THE EVENTS OF THE DAY PRE- 
! SENTED FIRST IN THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE. 



[126] 



Tub) 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 



Many who are not quite satisfied 
with the usual fine candies 
will find supreme delight in 



+■■ 




"Foolishly Good." 



■■* 



H. C. VIELE & CO. 

JEWELERS 

Watches, Clocks, Diamonds, Jewelry 

and Silverware 

— X — 

Repairing of Watches, Clocks and Jewelry 

— X — 

222 EIGHTH STREET 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



ri27i 



I 



Class '£1 ]\1AIDS and A MAX Tubman 



GIRLS AND SAVINGS 

TIh' Brink for Savings lias soniothing to ottVi- whicli adds to the 
attractiveness of anv girl. liOve, beauty and winsonieness cannot of 
course be stated in terms of money. But the hahit of thrift, the love of 
simplicity, and the absence of extravagance which the Savings habit gives 
to a girl do nuich to insure tiie permanence of her attractiveness. 

YOl'D BE SURPRISED 



]\Ioney spent is gone. Money stolen is tlreadful. Money lost is too 
bad. Money in your pocket is skittish. Money in the Bank — you'd be 
surprised. Try it. Open a Savings Account. 

GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK 

4, „ ., ., „ n. .., .„ „„ .. „. ,. ., ., „ „ „. .„ .. ™ „„ .. .. „ .. .. .. .. .. ,^ 

A ... .. m. .. .. .. ... .. .,. .. .. ., .. ,. .. .. ., ., 1 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . |, 

A. H. MERRY E. B. MERRY 

W. A. COOK, Sales Manager K. H. MERRY, Assistant Manager 

ESTABLISHED 1899 

MERRY BROTHERS 

Manufacturers of 

BRICK AND CLAY 
PRODUCTS 

City Office: Rooms 213-2M Herald HuiUiinfr— Plione 571 
Plant: 110-1.511 C.winnett St.— Phone 1H0 

YOUNG LADIES: See that your future homes are built with MERRY 
BROTHERS BRICK. 

112«| 



Tubman MAIDS and A .MAN Class '"21 



T 



HIS Annual was printed by 



Ridgely-Wing-Tidwell Co. 

''Pleasing Printers'' 

ENGRAVING WEDDING INVITATIONS 

MO NO GRAM MED STATIONERY 

VISITING CARDS 



302 Seventh St. Augusta, Ga. 

+„ — „ 

4. 



—USE- 
LIBERTY MOTOR OIL 

MORE MILES MORE POWER LESS CARBON 

For Sale at All Service Stations 

PEOPLES OIL COMPANY 

DISTRIBUTORS 



[1291 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



GOETCHIUS' 



Broad and Seventh Sts. 



DRUGS 

SODA WATER 
HUYLER'S CANDY 
NORRIS' CANDY 



GOETCHIUS' 



. — ._.4. 



— . — ^ 



The NEWEST and MOST 

FASCINATING FROCKS 

NOW ON DISPLAY FOR 

GRADUATION 

All the loveliness tliat good taste and 
skilled designing could give is incor- 
porated in tliese models which are 
quite in keeping with the spirit of 
youth itself. 

Come in and look over our heauti- 
ful assortment of 

Organdies, Dotted Swiss, 
and Crepe de Chine 




CASH AND CARRY 
SELF-SERVICE 



CARPENTER'^ 

50-50 
GROCERTERIA 



WE DELIVER ORDERS 
OF $10.00 OR MORE 



I 

710 Broad Street 
Phone 3649 

I — „ — „ — ,. — .. — .. — .. — .. — .. — » — >■ — ■■ — . — -f 



— .+ 

I 



BUY 

THE TUBMAN 
GIRLS 

GRADUATION 
GIFTS 

AT 

SCHWEIGERT'S \ 

The Leading Jeweler 



[130J 



Tubman 



MAIDS ami A MAN 



Class '£1 



4.. 



THE 

PLANTERS LOAN 

AND 

SAVINGS BANK 



SAFETY SERVICE 
SATISFACTION 



FOUR PER CENT 1 

Interest on Savings 1 
Accounts 



705 BROAD STREET 



■■+ 

-.5. 



CITIZENS LOAN 

AND 

INVESTMENT CO. I 

Herald Bldg. 
Augusta, Georgia 



WE SERVE THE 
PEOPLE 



L. J. HENRY 

'The Typewriter Man" 



REMINGTON 

MONARCH 

SMITH PREMIER 

and 

CORONA 

TYPEWRITERS 

— o 

i 

I 129 EIGHTH STREET | 

I i 



4 — . 

+. — 



s 
I 



(Jeorjrc C Blamhanl 

Francis A. Calhoun 



BLANCHARD 
& CALHOUN 

REAL ESTATE 

Insurance 
Investment Securities 



Homes for Sale Convenient to 

Tubman High School 
— o — 

MASONIC BUILDING 
Augusta, Georgia 



[1311 



Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 



18c per Week 
75c per Month 



-■+ 

I 



THE 

AUGUSTA 

HERALD 



Goes into 60 per cent 
more Augusta homes 
than any other paper. 



Phone 2036 and say 
"Send me The Herald" 



"" — ■+ 
— + 



THE 

CITIZENS AND 

SOUTHERN 

BANK 

Pays 4 per cent on Savings 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS 
$4,500,000 



No Account Too Large, 

None Too Small 



FRANKLIN 

Air-Cooled Six 
— o — 



20 miles to the gallon of gasoline 
12,500 miles to the set of tires 
50% slower yearly depreciation 



T. B. CORLEY 

Distributor 
551 BROAD STREET 



+- 



-+ 



W. W. Ramsey G. W. Legwen 

RAMSEY 

& LEGWEN 

COTTON FACTORS 

and Dealers in Buggies 
and Wagons 

— o — 

835 and 837 Reynolds St. 
Augusta, Georgia 



+ — > — > 



[132 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class '21 



AUGUSTA 
I MOTOR SALES 
COMPANY 

C;E0. p. ELLIOTT, Maiiajrer 

Distributors 

CHALMERS 

WINTON SIX 
MAXWELL CARS 



627 Broad Street 



Georgia j 



I Augusta 

i 

4 

+. 



Fifkliiifr Wallace, Pres. and Treas. 

E. L. Stellinp, Sec. and .Mjrr. 

PLANTERS 

COTTON OIL 

COMPANY 

Maniit'acturers and Ex))orters of 

COTTON SEED 
PRODUCTS 



I 



SERVICE 

The Greatest Asset of 
this Bank 

Many people who live in Aiijj;usta 
do nut know except in a general 
way the many advantages of this 
bank. 

.\ better acquaintance with us will 
convince you our service is best for 
any legitimate puri)Ose you may 
have in mind. 

Every man in Augusta who has need 
of financial assistance should learn 
of the advantages of a Banking Ac- 
count here. 

It may be worth while to you to 
know how truly helpful our service 

can be, 

MERCHANTS 
BANK 

Cai)ital and Surplus .'?.5()0,000.0I) 



+ 



COOPER 
HARDWARE CO. 

Augusta's Most Complete 
HARDWARE STORE 



— o — 



+. . . ., . — ,. — , 





REACH SPORTING 
GOODS 

— o — 




877 BROAD STREET 
Phone 551 


[1331 





Class '21 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 



4. , 



+ 



H, C TENNENT 
SUPPLY CO. 



Mill Supplies 

Blacksmith Supplies 

Auto Supplies 



Two Stores: 
613 and 1251 Broad Street 
Augusta, Georgia I 



A— 



GARDELLE'S 

The Reliable Drug Store 



We Ciin-v a t'DiiipU'te Line of 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 
TOILET GOODS 

Afrents for 

WHITMAN'S CANDIES 

o — 

PHYSICIANS' PRKSCKIPTIOXS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

- O 

GARDELLE'S 

()p]iositf MciTuiiiiriit 

744 Broad Street 



i Diamonds Watches 

FOR 

''Gifts that Last" 

SEE 

White 6 Kleiner 

QUALITY JEWELERS 

826 Broad 
Jewelry Silverware 



•I- 





THESE TWO 
FEEDS MAKE 

STURDY 
CHICKS 



The best 
by test 
sold only in 
Checkerboard I 
Ba^s by — 

Consumers Grocery Co. 

I)iv.trilmti>rs tor Purina Feeds 
PIIOXK 783 11(11 BHOAD ST. 



1134.1 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 






-.._t 



— 1+ 






L. J. SCHAUL & CO. 

Diamonds and Jewelry 

840 Broad St. 

Phone 545 

Augusta, Georgia 



CARR LEE 
GROCERY CO. 

WHOLESALE 

GROCERS 

— o — 

Distributors 

IDAHOME HIGH 
PATENT FLOUR 

— o — 
Triangular Block 



-+ 



I 



H.&H. 

Ice Cream for All Occasions 

Place your order for cream 
for socials no matter how- 
large or small. Special at- 
tention given to Parties antl 
Banquets. 

HAYNIE 
&HILLHOUSE 



Augusta 



628 Ellis St. 

Georsfia 



"Take Home a Brick" 



1 j We insure both Men and 

j i Women on Equal Terms. 



Women are important fac- 



I tors in the Business World 
j Today. 

I 

I Phone 682 or Call at Offices 

I 206-210 LAMAR BLDG. 

I LORICK 

I & VAIDEN 

j 

I State Agents 

i MISSOURI STATE LIFE 



[1351 



Class '"21 
* 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



ASK FOR 

BAKERITE 
BREAD 



Come in and See us Bake 
It every day Electrically 



720 BROAD STREET 
Opposite Monument 



SMITH BROS. 
COMPANY 

— o 

WHOLESALE 

GROCERS and GRAIN 

DEALERS 

— o — 

Specializing 

OMEGA FLOUR | 

Plain i 

i 1 

[DOLLY DIMPLE FLOURI 

i Self-Rising I 

I I 



JOS. E. 
GOETCHIUS 

DRUGGIST 

— o — 

Phones 

1774-1775-9162 

— o — 

1002 BROAD STREET 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



I 

i 
i 

■■4 



C. T. FUND & CO. 

Dealers in 

GROCERS' 
SPECIALTIES 

Ask for 
CORBY'S CAKE 



[130 1 



Tubr 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 



F. PHINIZY & CO. [ 
General Agents I 

Augusta, Georgia j 

PHOXK OXK 

No Risk so Lanje that We Cannot 

Provifir for: None so Small that ive 

do Not Care For. 

*t" — "■ — "" — "" — "" — "* — "■ — "' — " — "" — "" — " — ■■■—"•J* 



FARR & HOGAN 

CLOTHIERS AND 
FURNISHERS 

598 Broad 

"If Men Wear It, We Sell It" 



i I 

JNEELY&WILCOXJ 

j COTTON 

I FACTORS i 

I I 

Augusta, Georgia i 



.. — + 



+ 

SALE'S STUDIO 

Herald Building 

Made All Photographs 
in this Annual 

^. — ., — ., — ., — ., — ., — „ — .. — „ — .. — „ — ,. — „, — ,^ 



C D. KENNY CO. 

The Home of Good 

COFFEE, TEA AND 
SUGAR 

Kemeiiilicr tlie Place, 

976 Broad Phone 601 



+ — .. 



WILLIS IRVIN 

ARCHITECT 

1403-5 Lamar Building 
Tel. 3311 

Schools, Public Buildings 
and Residences 



,. — .. — .. — .._.. — . — ^ 



4.._.._.. 






BEST BY TEST 



Sliisky's Hoofing Materials 

Mantels, Tiles, (Irates, Builders' 

Supplies 

DAVID SLUSKY 
&SON 

1009 Broadway 




— + 



[137] 



Class 'SI 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubi 



* — . — . 



. ^ 



THE HENRY HUTT 

PLUMBING SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Plumbing. Heating and 
Sanitary Supplies 

ShowrciDiri and Office: 
(ill BROAD STREET 



C G. GARRARD 

MOTOR COMPANY 

Chandler Cleveland 

Motor Cars 



1 KESSEL BAKERY 



+ — 



1 



WUdl.KSAI.K and RKTAII. 



I BAKERY PRODUCTS 

i Telephone No. fl(i 

1 Ellis and Center Streets 
f 



WHITNEY-McNEIL 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Lighting Fixtures & Lamps 
of Quality 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES, ETC. 

841 Broad Street 



relei>licine 131(i 



+ 

i 
I 

i 



AWNINGS 
PORCH SHADES 
WALL PAPER 



T, G. BAILIE & CO. 

712 Broad Street 



J. WILLIE LEVY 
&SON 

Special Showing of 
Commencement Dresses 

Most l'ii-t(i-I^ite Ladies" Ready 
to \\'ear in tlie Sonth 

824 Broad St. 



Kodak Films 

New Novels 

Fine Stationery 

MURPHY 

STATIONERY 

COMPANY 

812 Broad Street 



H. R. POWELL 

REAL ESTATE 

AND LOANS 

Homes Farms 
Investments 



[lliHl 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '21 



POPE & FLEMING 

COTTON 
FACTORS 

Established 1885 
PHONES: 

257 Local 
finOS I.(iii<r Distance 

Augusta, Georgia 



4.,_.._.._.._„ , .._.. — 



RED HOT BARGAINS 

in evcrvtiiinfr. c^])ecially in 

Tennis Shoes 

Prices at tlie A'ery Lowest 

GREAT EASTERN 
SHOE COMPANY 

915 Broad St. 



TROWBRIDGE 
HARDWARE 

847 Broad 

Syracuse Plows a Specialty 
Beaver Wall Board 



4,- „„ „, „. 



1 



MORRIS GARAGE 

AND SUPPLY CO. 

509-11 BROAD ST. 

Automobile Accessories, 
Repairs and Storage 

ICXITIOX AXD MACHINE 
WORK A SPECIALTY 



VISIT 

THE COSY STORE 

Where you will find new and well 
selected stocks of 

Millinery, Waists, 

Unusual Gifts 

Novelties 

E. C. BALK & CO. 

ills BROAD STREET 
Phone :?S2 



.|,„ .„ „ „ „ „ ,„ 



LUNDAY 

ELECTRIC SERVICE 

Automobile Starting, 
Lighting and Ignition 

507 BROAD STREET 
Phone 760 



.._.. — ,). 



MOTES MOTOR 

COMPANY 

Distrilnitors of the 

COLUMBIA SIX 

"Gem of the Highway" 



509 Broad Street 



Repairs to Anything Electric 

EVE REPAIR CO. 

850-852 CHAFEE AVE. 
Augusta, Georgia 



Phone 1727 



[1391 



Class '£1 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tub), 



CASTLEBERRY 

AND WILCOX 
Grocers 

Cordially invite you to visit tlieir 
store, the most complete jirocery 

store in Aujrusta. 
Constant Fresh Shipments in every 
department. Orders promptly ex- 
ecuted liy mail. 

706 Broad Street 

+, ,,„ „, „„ „. „„ „. „. „„ „. .. „. ^ 



COTTON 

T. I. HICKMAN 

Camphell Hldjr. 

Augusta, Georgia 

I 

+ .. . — .._.. ._.. — 



+. — 



. .^ 



Win. Schweigert, Thos. S. Gary, 

Pres. Cashier 

U. M. Uilcy, Asst. Cashier 

UNION SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. liroad and Kijrhtli Sts. 

COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS 
ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 

4 Per Cent Interest 



+ — . . 



RUPERT-RHENEY 
GROCERY CO. 

■')()() Broad 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

Cash ami Carrv Prices 
also 

Charge or Delivery 

4 .._.._..L.,_.._.._.. 1.. 4. 



+ — ■ — ■" 



From 

BALK'S NURSERY 

226 Greene Street 

Phone 585 



4. — 



■ •+ 



Let Your Next Pair of 
Shoes be Walk-Overs 

WALK-OVER 

BOOT SHOP 
828 Broad Street 



4. — 



EASTERLING BROS. 



■+ 

I 
I 



Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, 
Poultry, Fish and Oysters 



Phones .58-500-.5()l 



472 Broad Street 



I L. G. M, ROBINSON 



I 
i 



Agent 

The Economy Advertising 
Company 

.\dvertisinfi: Novelties and Hank 
Snj)])lics 

Augusta, Georgia 



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